Fall 2020 - PHIL 201 D100

Epistemology (3)

Class Number: 3975

Delivery Method: Remote

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Th 11:30 AM – 2:20 PM
    REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    One of PHIL 100W (or equivalent), 120W (or equivalent), 121, 144, 150, 151, or COGS 100.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

A critical overview of recent accounts of the nature and scope of human knowledge and of justified or rational belief, and of philosophical issues that these accounts are intended to address. Students who have taken PHIL 301 cannot take this course for further credit.

COURSE DETAILS:

This is an introduction to the theory of knowledge (epistemology) for students contemplating a major (or minor) in philosophy. The goal of the course is to provide an overview of some of the main problems of epistemology, starting with the classical issues of skepticism about the external world and the nature of knowledge. The central issue is relatively easy to frame: if knowledge is justified true belief, as it is traditionally characterized, can we ever have knowledge about the world around us (or anything else, for that matter)? We will look at some major responses to skepticism, as well as challenges to the traditional characterization in the first part of this course.

The second part will explore some recent developments in epistemology, and issues that arise when we abandon the traditional individualistic stance and its focus on the skeptical challenge. These include the connection between epistemology and ethics, the nature of significance of disagreement, the epistemic value of testimony, feminist epistemology, etc.

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:

PHIL 201 is a required course for the Philosophy Major and the Philosophy and Methodology of Science Certificate

Grading

  • Midterm 20%
  • Paper: 5-6 pages 40%
  • Final Exam 40%

NOTES:

Course delivery: remote, synchronous. Online presence is required during scheduled lecture time.

Materials

MATERIALS + SUPPLIES:

In order to complete this course, students must have access to a computer or other internet accessing device that permits streaming video, word processing and teleconferencing with Zoom.

REQUIRED READING:

All readings will be supplied on Canvas.

Department Undergraduate Notes:

Thinking of a Philosophy Major or Minor? The Concentration in Law and Philosophy? The Certificate in Ethics? The Philosophy and Methodology of Science Certificate?
Contact the PHIL Advisor at philmgr@sfu.ca   More details on our website: SFU Philosophy

Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

TEACHING AT SFU IN FALL 2020

Teaching at SFU in fall 2020 will be conducted primarily through remote methods. There will be in-person course components in a few exceptional cases where this is fundamental to the educational goals of the course. Such course components will be clearly identified at registration, as will course components that will be “live” (synchronous) vs. at your own pace (asynchronous). Enrollment acknowledges that remote study may entail different modes of learning, interaction with your instructor, and ways of getting feedback on your work than may be the case for in-person classes. To ensure you can access all course materials, we recommend you have access to a computer with a microphone and camera, and the internet. In some cases your instructor may use Zoom or other means requiring a camera and microphone to invigilate exams. If proctoring software will be used, this will be confirmed in the first week of class.

Students with hidden or visible disabilities who believe they may need class or exam accommodations, including in the current context of remote learning, are encouraged to register with the SFU Centre for Accessible Learning (caladmin@sfu.ca or 778-782-3112).