Fall 2020 - PSYC 362 D100

Close Relationships (3)

Class Number: 3880

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    TBA
    REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    PSYC 201 and 260.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Reviews theory and research on the psychology of romantic relationships. Topics may include relationship theories, communication, social cognitive processes, intimate partner violence, and relationship interventions.

COURSE DETAILS:

In this course, you will learn about the science of close relationships with a specific focus on romantic relationships. The course will explore the different phases of relationships: what attracts people to partners, how and why people maintain their relationships, relationship difficulties and dissolution, and single life after relationships end. We will draw on important theories of close relationships to guide our understanding of these individual and dyadic processes.

Topics:
Attachment Theory, Initial Attraction & Self-Expansion Theory, Interdependence Theory & The Investment Model, Social Cognitive Processes, Relationship Conflict, Social Support, Sex, Passion & Intimacy, Jealousy and Infidelity, Suffocation Model of Marriage and Divorce, Singlehood Experiences.

Office hours:  Wednesday’s 3pm – 4pm & Friday’s 11am – 12pm (via Zoom)

A preliminary copy of the course syllabus is available at https://www.rewelab.com/teaching


THERE WILL BE NO PREREQUISITE WAIVERS GIVEN FOR THIS CLASS.

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:

Although we will focus on specific topics throughout the course, the major objectives of this class are to critically evaluate claims about close relationships using relationship research, and to apply your understanding of relationship theories and research about dyadic processes to explain different relationship processes.

Grading

  • Participation: 10%
  • Term Paper/Project: 15%
  • Final Exam: 12%
  • Mastery Quizzes 7% x 9 63%

NOTES:

Although we will focus on specific topics throughout the course, the major objectives of this class are to critically evaluate claims about close relationships using relationship research, and to apply your understanding of relationship theories and research about dyadic processes to explain different relationship processes.

This course will be taught remotely due to COVID-19: access to internet and a laptop and/or computer will be required.

Lectures:
This course will be taught remotely due to COVID-19. Lectures will involve ASYNCHRONOUS podcast episodes and occasional pre-recorded PPT lecture.

This course uses MASTERY GRADING. Thus, this course is designed to provide students multiple opportunities to try, face setbacks, figure out what they did not understand as well as they thought they did, and then succeed. Students demonstrate mastery by achieving 90% on a series of Mastery Quizzes and get THREE opportunities to master each quiz.

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

There is no textbook for this course. Readings will be available via the SFU library.

Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

TEACHING AT SFU IN FALL 2020

Teaching at SFU in fall 2020 will be conducted primarily through remote methods. There will be in-person course components in a few exceptional cases where this is fundamental to the educational goals of the course. Such course components will be clearly identified at registration, as will course components that will be “live” (synchronous) vs. at your own pace (asynchronous). Enrollment acknowledges that remote study may entail different modes of learning, interaction with your instructor, and ways of getting feedback on your work than may be the case for in-person classes. To ensure you can access all course materials, we recommend you have access to a computer with a microphone and camera, and the internet. In some cases your instructor may use Zoom or other means requiring a camera and microphone to invigilate exams. If proctoring software will be used, this will be confirmed in the first week of class.

Students with hidden or visible disabilities who believe they may need class or exam accommodations, including in the current context of remote learning, are encouraged to register with the SFU Centre for Accessible Learning (caladmin@sfu.ca or 778-782-3112).