Summer 2020 - ECON 103 D100

Principles of Microeconomics (4)

Class Number: 1728

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Tu 1:30 PM – 2:20 PM
    SSCC 9001, Burnaby

    Th 12:30 PM – 2:20 PM
    SSCB 9200, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Aug 16, 2020
    3:30 PM – 6:30 PM
    Location: TBA

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

The principal elements of theory concerning utility and value, price and costs, factor analysis, productivity, labor organization, competition and monopoly, and the theory of the firm. Students with credit for ECON 200 cannot take ECON 103 for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Soc.

COURSE DETAILS:

The course examines how individuals and firms make decisions by weighing up costs and benefits, and how the interaction of their decisions leads to market and social outcomes. The model of market supply and demand is employed to examine the effects of taxes, subsidies, and other government interventions in market activity. The implications of different market structures, including perfect competition and monopoly, are examined.  

Topics:  

  • Gains from trade
  • Supply and demand
  • Elasticity and its application
  • Government policies: price ceilings, price floors, quotas, taxes, subsidies, tariffs
  • The efficiency of markets
  • The costs of production
  • Firms in competitive markets
  • Monopoly

Grading

  • Tutorial participation and assignments 10%
  • Midterm #1 20%
  • Midterm #2 20%
  • Final exam 50%

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Mankiw, Kneebone, and McKenzie, Principles of Microeconomics, 8th Canadian Edition. Nelson, 2020.

RECOMMENDED READING:

Mankiw. Study Guide for Mankiw’s Principles of Microeconomics, 8th edition. Nelson, 2020. ISBN 978-0176888091.

Department Undergraduate Notes:

***NO TUTORIALS DURING THE FIRST WEEK OF CLASSES***

Students requiring accommodations as a result of a disability must contact the Centre for Accessible Learning (CAL) at 778-782-3112 or caladmin@sfu.ca.

Registrar Notes:

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS