Summer 2020 - PSYC 379 J100

Clinical Forensic Psychology (3)

Class Number: 3971

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Tu 5:30 PM – 8:20 PM
    REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Aug 18, 2020
    7:00 PM – 10:00 PM
    Location: TBA

  • Prerequisites:

    PSYC 201 and 268. PSYC 241 is recommended.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Clinical approaches to the understanding of behavior in criminal and civil forensic settings. Topics related to the assessment, treatment, and management of people suffering from mental disorder.

COURSE DETAILS:

The course will examine the leading approaches used in clinical forensic psychology and discuss the role that clinical forensic psychologists play in assisting the legal system at various stages. Clinical forensic psychologists conduct psychological assessments and treatment in a number of legal, correctional, and forensic settings. Forensic assessments include criminal responsibility and competency evaluations, risk assessments for different types of violence, identification of treatment needs of offenders, and specialized psycholegal evaluations. Clinical forensic psychologists also conduct research on a variety of psycholegal topics. This course is designed to provide students with an overview of the primary areas within clinical forensic psychology, with an emphasis on the assessment and management of violence risk in criminal and civil forensic settings. The course will also examine some of the key challenges and debates currently facing the field. Specific topics that will be covered include the assessment of various forms of violence (e.g., physical violence, sexual violence, intimate partner violence, stalking), major risk factors for violence (e.g., psychopathy), criminal responsibility and competency evaluations, treatments aimed to reduce violence, and specialized populations. The main goals of the course are to demonstrate the role that clinical psychology plays in various legal and criminal justice matters, as well as the role that scientific research plays in guiding psycholegal practice. The course generally focuses on issues related to psychology and the criminal justice system, although some issues related to civil law will be covered. An underlying theme throughout the course will be the importance of applying psychological principles and scientific reasoning to the intersection of law and clinical psychology. This course operates under the assumption that students have taken introductory courses in law and psychology.

Grading

  • Midterm Exam: 35%
  • Risk Assessment Worksheets: 5%
  • Risk Assessment Report: 25%
  • Final Exam: 35%

NOTES:

 
 

Please note that all teaching at SFU in summer term 2020 will be conducted through remote methods. Enrollment in this course acknowledges that remote study may entail different modes of learning, interaction with your instructor, and ways of getting feedback on your work than may be the case for in-person classes.

Students with hidden or visible disabilities who believe they may need class or exam accommodations, including in the current context of remote learning, are encouraged to register with the SFU Centre for Accessible Learning (caladmin@sfu.ca or 778-782-3112) as soon as possible to ensure that they are eligible and that approved accommodations and services are implemented in a timely fashion.


Canvas:

This course will use Canvas. Most course materials will be posted on Canvas (i.e., this syllabus, lecture slides, assignments, and other resources). Important course announcements will also be posted on Canvas. Additionally, you will be able to check your grades for all course components. You are also encouraged to use the discussion board or chat functions to contact other students about missed lectures, post questions or clarifications about the course concepts, or organize study sessions with your classmates. You can access Canvas from the SFU homepage, click on “sign in” then on “Canvas” and sign in with your SFU login information. Once signed in, you will see a list of the courses you are taking that are using Canvas each semester.

Assignments:
There is one written assignment with two components required in this course. The assignment is designed to provide you with an opportunity to practice your critical thinking skills and apply course concepts to novel circumstances. The risk assessment report and ratings for the report involve conducting a risk assessment on a hypothetical case vignette about an offender, completing risk ratings for two violence risk assessment tools, and writing a risk assessment report based on their evaluation. See the handout “Risk Assessment Report” on Canvas for full details.

Exams:
There are two exams in this course: a midterm exam and a final exam. The final exam is not cumulative. All material covered in the lectures and assigned readings is testable. Exams will consist of multiple choice, short answer, and long answer questions. Students will be provided with a list of potential long answer questions one week prior to each exam to help them prepare in advance.

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

There is no required textbook for this course.  Instead, students are assigned 1 to 2 articles per week that will be available online.

Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

TEACHING AT SFU IN SUMMER 2020

Please note that all teaching at SFU in summer term 2020 will be conducted through remote methods. Enrollment in this course acknowledges that remote study may entail different modes of learning, interaction with your instructor, and ways of getting feedback on your work than may be the case for in-person classes.

Students with hidden or visible disabilities who believe they may need class or exam accommodations, including in the current context of remote learning, are encouraged to register with the SFU Centre for Accessible Learning (caladmin@sfu.ca or 778-782-3112) as soon as possible to ensure that they are eligible and that approved accommodations and services are implemented in a timely fashion.