Spring 2022 - CMNS 357 D100

Audio Media Analysis (4)

Class Number: 2934

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Tu 10:30 AM – 12:20 PM
    SSCK 8652, Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    CMNS 258 or CMNS 226, with a minimum grade of C-; or equivalent introductory media course with permission of the instructor.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

An intensive analysis of the design and function of audio in all forms of electroacoustic media, including both historical analog and contemporary digital forms of communication. Gives specific attention to sound design in film, television, radio, advertising, gaming, online and other types of media soundtracks. The structure of broadcast media is considered as well as surrogate listening environments, the sound recording as document, patterns and functions of electroacoustic media usage in daily life, and alternative uses of audio media. The format of the course will be seminars with accompanying labs in order to cover both the theoretical and applied aspects of media analysis. Students who have completed CMNS 386-4 in Spring 2008, 2009 or 2010 may not complete this course for further credit.

COURSE DETAILS:

Overview:

An intensive analysis of the design and function of audio in all forms of electroacoustic media, including both historical analog and contemporary digital forms of communication. Gives specific attention to sound design in film, television, radio, advertising, gaming, online and other types of media soundtracks. The structure of broadcast media is considered as well as surrogate listening environments, the sound recording as document, patterns and functions of electroacoustic media usage in daily life, and alternative uses of audio media. The format of the course will be seminars with accompanying labs in order to cover both the theoretical and applied aspects of media analysis.

This course provides an intensive analysis of the design and function of audio in all forms of electroacoustic media, including historical, analogue, and contemporary digital forms of communication. Specific attention will be given to sound design in advertising, film, television, and other types of soundtracks; the structure of broadcast media considered as a surrogate listening environment; the sound recording as document; patterns and functions of electroacoustic media usage in daily life; and alternative uses of audio media.

The format of the course will be seminar/lab, in order to cover both the theoretical and applied aspects of media analysis. Student work will consist of: (1) a media use audit of aspects of the student’s media consumption patterns; (2) a research project on course texts and other literature; (3) Applied media lab assignments done in class: and (4) an applied analysis or production project.

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:

Learning Goals:

  • Understand how the history of recording sound, including production techniques and its commodification, affects how we listen and consume audio media
  • Understand how listening can provide a deeper understanding of our environments
  • Developing our personal audio media production capacity

Applied Skills:

  • Sound recording in the studio and in the field
  • Audio media production techniques (editing, processing, mixing, compression…)
  • Production of a podcast

Grading

  • Research outline 10%
  • Media use audit 10%
  • Research paper/presentation 20%
  • Final Applied Audio Project 30%
  • Lab Assignments (various in-lab projects) 30%

NOTES:

The School expects that the grades awarded in this course will bear some reasonable relation to established university-wide practices with respect to both levels and distribution of grades. In addition, the School will follow Policy S10.01 with respect to Academic Integrity, and Policies S10.02, S10.03 and S10.04 as regards Student Discipline (note: as of May 1, 2009 the previous T10 series of policies covering Intellectual Honesty (T10.02), and Academic Discipline (T10.03) have been replaced with the new S10 series of policies)

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

The course readings will be listed in the syllabus and made available electronically via Canvas.


Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

TEACHING AT SFU IN SPRING 2022

Teaching at SFU in spring 2022 will involve primarily in-person instruction, with safety plans in place.  Some courses will still be offered through remote methods, and if so, this will be clearly identified in the schedule of classes.  You will also know at enrollment whether remote course components will be “live” (synchronous) or at your own pace (asynchronous).

Enrolling in a course acknowledges that you are able to attend in whatever format is required.  You should not enroll in a course that is in-person if you are not able to return to campus, and should be aware that remote study may entail different modes of learning, interaction with your instructor, and ways of getting feedback on your work than may be the case for in-person classes.

Students with hidden or visible disabilities who may need class or exam accommodations, including in the context of remote learning, are advised to register with the SFU Centre for Accessible Learning (caladmin@sfu.ca or 778-782-3112) as early as possible in order to prepare for the spring 2022 term.