Spring 2023 - CMNS 830 G100

Media & Cultural Studies (5)

Class Number: 1331

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Mo 12:30 PM – 4:20 PM
    SSCK 8652, Burnaby

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Examines current debates in media and cultural studies, including hegemony, biopower, affect, subjectivity, cultures of capitalism and cultures of resistance.

COURSE DETAILS:

This seminar is organized around the question of access in media studies. The idea that broadening access to media technologies is a social good has been fundamental to the field, from the Birmingham school of cultural studies, to feminist interventions, to early internet studies work on the “digital divide.” This seminar is organized around recent interventions in critical media studies that complicate the category of access, focusing on media studies that centers the work minoritized communities do with media, technology, and data towards justice. We will primarily consider perspectives from disability studies, critical race studies, queer and trans approaches, and activist media studies.

Grading

  • Short Paper 20%
  • Term Paper 40%
  • Presentation 20%
  • Contributions to Seminar 20%

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Course readings will be made available as PDFs through the course CANVAS site.

REQUIRED READING NOTES:

Your personalized Course Material list, including digital and physical textbooks, are available through the SFU Bookstore website by simply entering your Computing ID at: shop.sfu.ca/course-materials/my-personalized-course-materials.

Graduate Studies Notes:

Important dates and deadlines for graduate students are found here: http://www.sfu.ca/dean-gradstudies/current/important_dates/guidelines.html. The deadline to drop a course with a 100% refund is the end of week 2. The deadline to drop with no notation on your transcript is the end of week 3.

Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity website http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating. Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the university community. Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the university. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the university. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html