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Department of Geography | Faculty of Environment Simon Fraser University Calendar | Summer 2024

Climate Change and Society Minor

Admission Requirements

All students must be in good academic standing and must obtain approval from the Geography Academic Advisor to be enrolled in the climate change and society minor. Students may apply for admission to this minor program at any time.

Program Requirements

Students must complete a minimum of 23 units as follows.

Lower Division Requirements

Complete both of

GEOG 104 - Climate Change, Water, and Society (3)

An examination of climate change, its interaction with water availability, and how humans cope with these altered circumstances. Students who have completed GEOG 102 prior to the fall 2011 term may not complete this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sci/Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
OL01 Tara Holland
Online
GEOG 111 - Earth Systems (3)

An introduction to landforms, climates, soils and vegetation; their origins, distributions, interrelationships and roles in the ecosystem. Laboratory work and field trips are included. Breadth-Science.

Complete one of

EVSC 100 - Introduction to Environmental Science (3)

Introduces students to the study of environmental science. Lecture material spans contributing disciplines, emphasizing integration of diverse concepts to understand environmental problems. Tutorials develop core academic skills in environmental science context. Students who have completed EVSC 200 may not complete this course for further credit. Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
B100 Anna Hippmann
TBD
B101 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Mon, Wed, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
B102 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Mon, Wed, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
B103 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Mon, Wed, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
B104 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Mon, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Wed, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
Burnaby
B105 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Mon, Wed, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
B106 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Mon, Wed, 4:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
B107 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Mon, Wed, 5:30–6:20 p.m.
Burnaby
GEOG 100 - Our World: Introducing Human Geography (3)

A geographical introduction to how humans shape our world, with attention also given to how it shapes us. Themes may include: culture, economic activities, environmental change, globalization, politics, population, resources, and urbanization. Breadth-Humanities/Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
OL01 Leanne Roderick
Online
GEOG 214 - Weather and Climate (3)

An examination of the basic principles and processes governing the Earth's weather and climate. Topics include: radiation, greenhouse effect, clouds, precipitation, atmospheric circulation, mid-latitude cyclones, tropical storms, climate change. Prerequisite: GEOG 111. Quantitative.

REM 100 - Global Change (3)

The Earth is experiencing the most dramatic environmental changes it has for thousands of years. How did we end up here? Provides an interdisciplinary perspective on the forces behind our ever-increasing environmental footprint. Highlights how ideologies and societal structures have shaped how we interact with the environment and explores the necessary changes for a more sustainable future. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
OL01 Sessional Instructor
Alexander Cancelli
Online

Upper Division Requirements

Climate Science Group

Complete two of

EVSC 334 - Earth's Past Climates (4)

Paleoclimatology is the study of how and why Earth's climate has changed in the past. Paleoclimalologists study ice ages, past abrupt changes, and what the Earth was like during past climate warm periods. The knowledge gained from paleoclimate studies provides us with the information needed to refine climate models, so that we understand how the Earth's climate works, and better predict how human activity will impact climate in the future. Describes the tools used by paleoclimatologists to reconstruct past climate change and evaluate the hypothesis put forth to explain those changes. Prerequisite: REM 100 or EVSC 100; GEOG 111 or EASC 101 or EASC 106; and 45 units. Recommended: EASC 210, GEOG 214 or GEOG 215. Students with credit for REM 334 may not take this course for further credit. Students who have taken REM 463-3 "Special Topics" in Spring 2019 may not enroll in this course for further credit.

or REM 334 - Earth's Past Climates (4)

Paleoclimatology is the study of how and why Earth's climate has changed in the past. Paleoclimatologists study ice ages, past abrupt changes, and what the Earth was like during past climate warm periods. The knowledge gained from paleoclimate studies provides us with the information needed to refine climate models, so that we understand how the Earth's climate works, and better predict how human activity will impact climate in the future. Describes the tools used by paleoclimatologists to reconstruct past climate change and evaluate the hypothesis put forth to explain those changes. Prerequisite: REM 100 or EVSC 100; GEOG 111 or EASC 101 or EASC 106; and 45 units. Recommended: EASC 210, GEOG 214 or GEOG 215. Students with credit for EVSC 334 may not take this course for further credit. Students who have taken REM 463-3 "Special Topics" in Spring 2019 may not enroll in this course for further credit.

GEOG 314 - The Climate System (4)

A survey of the climate system, with emphasis on the interactions among its components; radiation, energy and water balances; carbon cycle; climate sensitivity and feedbacks; natural and human-induced climate change. Prerequisite: GEOG 214. Quantitative.

GEOG 414 - Climate Change (4)

An examination of recent advances in climate change science drawing upon observational and theoretical studies; application of climate models. Prerequisite: GEOG 314. Quantitative.

REM 370 - Global Resource Issues in Oceanography (4)

Uses the lens of ocean resource management to introduce principles of oceanography, including ocean circulation, ocean carbon cycling, nutrients and biological productivity, oceans and the climate system, and global fisheries. Provides basic understanding of ocean resource management through case studies such as plastic pollution, ocean acidification, Arctic Ocean change, and global fisheries management. Prerequisite: EVSC 100, or GEOG 111, or REM 100, and 45 units. Students with credit for MASC 435 may not take this course for further credit.

Climate Justice Group

Complete one of

GEOG 333 - Climate Crisis: Understanding a World on Fire (4)

An introduction to the fundamental social and human-geographical dimensions of climate change: the ideas, tools, and institutions through which human communities and institutions are responding (or not) to the challenges of a warming planet. Prerequisite: A minimum of 45 units.

GEOG 389W - Nature and Society (4)

Examines the relationship between nature and society, covering the dominant geographical approaches to human-environment interaction, and their social, spatial, and political economic effects. Prerequisite: At least 45 units, including GEOG 100 or REM 100. Writing.

INDG 433 - Indigenous Environmental Justice and Activism (4)

Examines contemporary writings regarding Indigenous environmental logic and environmental concerns of contemporary times. Studies effects of resource extraction upon Indigenous nations, globalization, genetic modifications, health, intellectual property, spiritual beliefs, culture and society, art and language and compares these with specific Indigenous logic at the time of contact. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students with credit for FNST 433 may not take this course for further credit.

LBST 311 - Labour and the Environment (3)

The changing relationships between unions and environmental groups; how work in various industries contribute to climate change; and how climate-change policies affect workers in different ways. The consequences of climate policies for different categories of workers, identified by economic sector, geographic location, gender, ethnicity, and Aboriginal status. Prerequisite: 30 units. Strongly Recommended: LBST 101.

Climate Change Solutions Group

Complete one of

CMNS 311 - Topics in Communication and Social Justice (4)

Topics pertain to issues of inequality, resistance and activism with a focus on entanglements with media and communication. Explores how relations of power are shaped and contested through media and communication. Topics include: racial justice, environmental policies, globalization, social activism, and labour. This course can be repeated once for credit (up to a maximum of two times). Prerequisite: 17 CMNS units with a minimum grade of C- or 45 units with a minimum CGPA of 2.00.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Shane Gunster
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Vancouver
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Vancouver
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Vancouver
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Vancouver
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 4:30–5:20 p.m.
Vancouver
D200 Victoria Thomas
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D201 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D202 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D203 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D204 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
IS 373 - Global Environmental Politics (4)

Examines international efforts to respond to global environmental challenges, such as climate change, deforestation, and the degradation of the oceans. Investigates obstacles to effective action and possible ways forward. Explores the role of a range of key actors, including states, intergovernmental organizations, multinational companies, NGOs, and social movements. Prerequisite: 45 units.

POL 452W - Energy Policy (4)

Examines the politics and policies of energy, including historical and technical perspectives. Topics include alternative energy, climate change, regulatory policy, and the economics of energy, as well as practical case studies. Students who have completed POL 459 in 2009 and 2010 may not complete this course for further credit. Writing.

REM 350 - Energy Management for a Sustainable Climate and Society (4)

An interdisciplinary approach to transforming energy systems in pursuit of sustainable climate and society. Perspectives include thermodynamics, resource potentials, technological potentials, economic evaluation, implementation of transformative public policies, political-economy assessment of policy constraints, national and sub-national governance options, behavioural change potentials, global diplomacy, and pursuit of greater equity within and between countries. Prerequisite: 45 units. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Will Niver
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–4:20 p.m.
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
REM 355 - Sustainable Transportation for a Zero-Emissions World (3)

Explores the transportation system and how to achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emissions as well as other sustainability goals. Topics include zero-emissions vehicles, low-carbon fuels, shared mobility, vehicle automation, and reduced vehicle use. An interdisciplinary approach is followed, including analyses of environmental and resource impacts, consumer behaviour, systems, technology change, and climate policy. Prerequisite: 45 units or permission of instructor.

REM 356W - Environmental Policy (3)

Provides an overview of policy and governance approaches used to manage the natural environment from international to local levels. The history, basic concepts, and key strategies of modern environmental policy are presented and discussed. Students then analyze and critique environmental policy across scales regarding climate, forests, oceans, and urban landscapes focusing on determining the effectiveness and efficiency of different approaches to regulate and manage the environment. Prerequisite: One of REM 100, GEOG 100, GEOG 111, or EVSC 100; and 45 units. Students with credit for REM 356 may not take this course for further credit. Writing.

Residency Requirements and Transfer Credit

  • At least half of the program's total units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.
  • At least two thirds of the program's total upper division units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.