Fall 2020 - IS 800 G100

Problems of International Policy and Practice (4)

Class Number: 5006

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Tu 10:00 AM – 1:50 PM
    REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby

  • Prerequisites:

    Graduate students enrolled in the MA in International Studies, or permission of the instructor.

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

An inter-disciplinary course which aims to bring to bear different perspectives on problems of International policy and practice. The particular problems taken up will change over time in light of global developments and current events.

COURSE DETAILS:

This course is designed to focus on the skills and applications of research and writing that are relevant beyond academia, and which IS students will likely encounter across governmental, nongovernmental, and private sectors. Much of this work involves researching, over a relatively short period of time, what has been written about a specific topic or problem and organizing key arguments about it, often going so far as to think through and develop arguments in favour of a particular course of action. This kind of work requires clarity of purpose, the capacity to identify and synthesize key ideas, and economical and authoritative writing.

Students will develop a diverse set of research and writing skills through five assignments. These assignments are of the type that students of International Studies may expect to be asked to take up in their professional careers. Three of the assignments will address assigned topics and questions, while two of the assignments provide opportunities for students to begin pursuing their own research and professional interests.

There are no assigned readings. Recommendations for initial readings and other resources will be provided during the lectures. Students will be expected, with guidance, to identify relevant research sources, and to draw extensively on web-based materials, including ‘grey literature’ (e.g. the literature produced by international organizations, research institutions, policy think-tanks, etc.) and, when relevant, news media.

This course incorporates MAIS professional development components led by Aleks Besan.

Grading

  • Literature Review 20%
  • Briefing Paper 20%
  • Op-Ed Essay 20%
  • Policy Paper 20%
  • Practitioner Interview report and presentation 20%

NOTES:

Assessment:

Each student will produce each of the following five assignments:

1. Literature Review (between 3500 and 4000 words) – topic: natural resource curse

2. Briefing Paper (approximately 1500 words) – topic: protracted refugee situations

3. Op-Ed Essay suitable for publication in a major newspaper (maximum 1000 words) – topic: ethics of representing the suffering of others

4. Policy Paper (maximum 2000 words) – topic: student’s choice

5. Practitioner Interview report and presentation (maximum 1,200 words, and 12 minute oral presentation) – topic: student’s choice

For the first three assignments, initial content on the three assigned topics (natural resource curse, protracted refugee situations, and ethics of representing suffering of others) will be provided through lectures and seminars. There are no assigned readings. Recommendations for initial readings and other resources will be provided during the lectures. Students will be expected, with guidance, to identify relevant research sources, and to draw extensively on web-based materials, including ‘grey literature’ (e.g. the literature produced by international organizations, research institutions, policy think-tanks, etc.) and, when relevant, news media.

Each student will receive detailed comments, and a projected letter grade, on the first three assignments and will also have the opportunity to meet individually with the instructor to discuss these review comments. Following receipt of these review comments, students will be given the opportunity to revise and resubmit each of the assignments for their final assessments and grades.

For the final two assignments, students will develop their own foci, submit these topics for approval from the instructor, and proceed upon approval. The intention is for both of these assignments to be oriented to each student’s unique research and professional interests.

The final two assignments (policy paper, and practitioner interview report) will only be submitted once for final assessment.

Students will be required to submit their written assignments to Turnitin.com in order to receive credit for the assignments and for the course.

The School for International Studies strictly enforces the University's policies regarding plagiarism and other forms of academic dishonesty. Information about these policies can be found at: http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/teaching.html.

REQUIREMENTS:

This course will be delivered via online platforms, such as Zoom, Canvas, Blackboard, etc.

Students are required to have a computer, with a microphone, webcam, and speakers. They also must have good access to the Internet.

Microsoft Office is required, and a free version of Office 365 is available to SFU students here: https://www.sfu.ca/itservices/technical/software/office365.html.

Students will be required to upload assignments to Canvas and through Turnitin.com.

Graduate Studies Notes:

Important dates and deadlines for graduate students are found here: http://www.sfu.ca/dean-gradstudies/current/important_dates/guidelines.html. The deadline to drop a course with a 100% refund is the end of week 2. The deadline to drop with no notation on your transcript is the end of week 3.

Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

TEACHING AT SFU IN FALL 2020

Teaching at SFU in fall 2020 will be conducted primarily through remote methods. There will be in-person course components in a few exceptional cases where this is fundamental to the educational goals of the course. Such course components will be clearly identified at registration, as will course components that will be “live” (synchronous) vs. at your own pace (asynchronous). Enrollment acknowledges that remote study may entail different modes of learning, interaction with your instructor, and ways of getting feedback on your work than may be the case for in-person classes. To ensure you can access all course materials, we recommend you have access to a computer with a microphone and camera, and the internet. In some cases your instructor may use Zoom or other means requiring a camera and microphone to invigilate exams. If proctoring software will be used, this will be confirmed in the first week of class.

Students with hidden or visible disabilities who believe they may need class or exam accommodations, including in the current context of remote learning, are encouraged to register with the SFU Centre for Accessible Learning (caladmin@sfu.ca or 778-782-3112).