Summer 2022 - URB 610 G100

Urban Design: Integrating Theory and Practice (4)

Class Number: 2036

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Th 5:30 PM – 9:20 PM
    HCC 2510, Vancouver

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

This course is an examination of urban design as a discipline that involves the environmental, aesthetic, social, economic, geographic, ecological, historical, political, and cultural aspects of the built environment. The importance of creative design, the interrelationship between the spatial organization of a city, its efficient delivery of services, the social, cultural and economic considerations of the public realm, as well as the process of change in our pluralistic society will all be considered.

COURSE DETAILS:


Overview

Research: This course is envisioned as a lively and intensive quest to examine, understand and interact with Vancouver’s exemplary urban fabric. Using a variety of investigative tools, we will actively explore urban design case studies via field trips, directed exercises, and interactive workshops. Using methodologies developed by Jan Ghel, we will observe, catalogue and reflect on how people relate to their surroundings, including their movements, interactions and behaviour.

Ideas and Structure: Then we will critically examine the broader assumptions underlying urban design approach and principles. We will strive to connect visionary thinking with project outcomes – how ideas shape the physical components of the private and public realm. In teams, we will engage and explore the city around us, and hone our understanding of the three major interrelated physical components of Urban Design:

  • Built Form
  • Open Space
  • Streets

Process: The complex interplay of designers, landowners, policy-makers, special interest groups and citizens are the collective authors of this city, and we shall investigate their individual roles and influences. We will examine the process of these intersecting disciplines by identifying strategies and specific urban design solutions that maximize key outcomes, such as:

  • Liveability, affordability, and equity
  • Social interaction and activity
  • Economic sustainability and social equity
  • Aesthetics and artistic curiosity
  • Ecological resilience and sustainability
  • Functionality

We will also explore instances where these aspirations have not proved successful and learn from past missteps.

Students will:

  • Explore the urban environment and gain facility with urban design terminology
  • Reflect on the issues, principles and philosophies that underpin current and past urban design approaches
  • Investigate contemporary and classic best-practice analogues to create an informed position on urban design theory and implementation
  • Develop a high-level Urban Design Strategy for a site in a Vancouver neighbourhood using tools derived from policy, case studies, feasibility programming, site functionality, public realm and streetscape.


Note: Students are not required to have prior knowledge of design skills or design software to take this course, but a working knowledge of PowerPoint is helpful to generate presentation/submission materials. During class, basic graphic communication tools will be reviewed such as diagramming and presentation design. The goal is to increase ‘design literacy’ with regard to the visual tools available to designers. If you have a strong design background in architecture, landscape architecture or a related discipline, then you may choose to create a massing solution for the Final Project Assignment.

Grading

  • Urban Design Session/Lecture Summary Paper 20%
  • Urban Design Deep Dive Group Presentation 35%
  • Final Project Urban Design Strategy Presentation 45%

NOTES:

GRADUATE STUDIES NOTES:
Important dates and deadlines for graduate students are found here: 
http://www.sfu.ca/dean-gradstudies/current/important_dates/guidelines.html.
The deadline to drop a course with a 100% refund is the end of week 2. The deadline to drop with no notation on your transcript is the end of week 3.  

REGISTRAR NOTES: SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://students.sfu.ca/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English. Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

The following required readings will be available on reserve through the SFU library.

  • How to Study Public Life, Jan Gehl, chapters 1-3
  • Streetfight: Handbook for an Urban Revolution, Janette Sadik-Khan, chapter 4
  • Vancouverism, Larry Beasley. Prologue, by Frances Bula, pg 13-33
  • The Image of the City, Kevin Lynch, pgs 46-90
  • Tactical Urbanism: Short-term Action for Long-term Change, Mike Lydon, ch 4

Other required readings are available online and will be noted in the course syllabus.

RECOMMENDED READING:

Additional resources

Sick City
: Disease, Race, Inequality and Urban Land, Patrick Condon

Happy City, Transforming Our Lives Through Urban Design, Charles Montgomery

Sourcebook of Contemporary Urban Design, Francesca Mola

A Guidebook to Contemporary Architecture in Vancouver, Chris MacDonald

Great Streets, Allan B. Jacobs

The Rise of the Creative Class, Richard Florida


Graduate Studies Notes:

Important dates and deadlines for graduate students are found here: http://www.sfu.ca/dean-gradstudies/current/important_dates/guidelines.html. The deadline to drop a course with a 100% refund is the end of week 2. The deadline to drop with no notation on your transcript is the end of week 3.

Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

TEACHING AT SFU IN SUMMER 2022

Teaching at SFU in summer 2022 will involve primarily in-person instruction.  Some courses may be offered through alternative methods (remote, online, blended), and if so, this will be clearly identified in the schedule of classes. 

Enrolling in a course acknowledges that you are able to attend in whatever format is required.  You should not enroll in a course that is in-person if you are not able to return to campus, and should be aware that remote, online, or blended courses study may entail different modes of learning, interaction with your instructor, and ways of getting feedback on your work than may be the case for in-person classes.

Students with hidden or visible disabilities who may need class or exam accommodations, including in the context of remote learning, are advised to register with the SFU Centre for Accessible Learning (caladmin@sfu.ca or 778-782-3112) as early as possible in order to prepare for the summer 2022 term.