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Sustainable Development Program | Faculty of Environment Simon Fraser University Calendar | Summer 2024

Sustainable Development

Certificate

Admission Requirements

Students wishing to enroll in the certificate normally must be enrolled in a degree program at SFU and be in good academic standing. Contact the REM Academic Advisor for more information and for approval to be enrolled in the certificate.

Program Requirements

Students complete six (6) courses totaling 20-21 units.

Complete all of

SD 281 - Introduction to Sustainability (3)

Introduces the challenges and opportunities for developing sustainable communities and a sustainable world, through the framework of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) and alternative perspectives around sustainability (e.g. Indigenous, just sustainabilities etc.). Students will also learn from the practical experience of diverse experts and sustainability professionals. Conventional approaches to sustainable development will be critiqued to ensure considerations for equity and social justice. Highlights will be showcased from the Global North and Global South. Students with credit for REM 281 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
OL01 Tammara Soma
Online
SD 381 - Building Sustainable Communities (4)

Engages students in understanding how to plan and cultivate sustainability at the community and city level, taking into consideration the environmental, economic, and social aspects of development. Explores and analyzes policy instruments, planning tools, and strategies from around the world for engaging people and institutions in building sustainable communities. Prerequisite: One of PLAN 100, PLAN 200, REM 100, or SD 281; and 45 units. Students with credit for REM 381 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
OL01 Laura Tate
Online
SD 481 - Global Sustainability Governance and Action (4)

From sustainability debates to policy windows and strategic goals (e.g., UN Sustainable Development Goals), students engage with tools and concepts to enable equitable change across contexts and sectors. This includes how policy is created, who the main players are in effecting change, and how we track and adapt to outcomes. Prerequisite: One of PLAN 100, PLAN 200, REM 100, or SD 281; and 60 units. Students with credit for REM 481 may not take this course for further credit.

Complete two of

CMNS 130 - Communication and Social Change (3)

An introduction to the forms, theories and institutions of communication as they relate to broader social change, with a focus on the political, economic and regulatory shifts characterizing Canadian and transnational media systems. This course is required for a major, honours or minor in communication.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
OL01 Byron Hauck
Online
ECON 260 - Environmental Economics (3)

Economic analysis of environmental problems (water and air pollution, etc.). Evaluation of market failures due to externalities and public goods. Market and non-market regulation of environmental problems. Prerequisite: ECON 103 with a minimum grade of C- or ECON 113 with a minimum grade of A-. Students with credit for ECON 360 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Kevin Wainwright
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
GEOG 104 - Climate Change, Water, and Society (3)

An examination of climate change, its interaction with water availability, and how humans cope with these altered circumstances. Students who have completed GEOG 102 prior to the fall 2011 term may not complete this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sci/Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
OL01 Tara Holland
Online
GEOG 261 - Encountering the City (3)

An introduction to key concepts and themes in contemporary geographical approaches to cities and urbanization. Prerequisite: GEOG 100 or 102. Breadth-Social Sciences.

HIST 111 - Histories of Technology (3)

An introduction to the social contexts and historical effects of major developments in technology such as industrialization and steam power; the construction of large techno-social systems like gas lighting and electrical grids; networks of scientific and enviro-technical experts; war industries; and cultures of "the bomb" during the nuclear age. Students with credit for HIST 363 cannot take HIST 111 for further credit. Breadth-Hum/Social Sci/Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Aaron Windel
Jun 25 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, Fri, 12:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 Aaron Windel
Jun 25 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, Fri, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D102 Aaron Windel
Jun 25 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, Fri, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
HIST 132 - Global Environmental History (3)

A planetary-scale introduction to reciprocal human-environment interactions from the discovery of fire to the present day. Case studies focus on humans and non-human actors in specific locales, and their movement across continents and oceans. Themes include climate, energy regimes, disease, science and technology, agriculture, subsistence, and landscape change. Breadth-Hum/Social Sci/Science.

HSCI 160 - Global Perspectives on Health (3)

An introduction to the differences in health and health services among the nations of the globe. Vulnerable sub-populations worldwide and their special health needs. Mechanisms whereby events in one country can impact health in another. Future worldwide health risks, their economic and health consequences. SARS, avian 'flu,' West Nile virus, 'mad cow disease,' antibiotic resistant malaria or tuberculosis. Dangers to rich and poor nations from ignoring health problems in developing world. Breadth-Social Sciences.

HSCI 216 - Ecological Determinants of Human Growth, Development and Health (3)

Effects that social and ecological factors have on human growth, development and health. Challenges such as epidemics, natural catastrophes, industrialization, globalization, migration, poverty, war, global warming, etc, leading to evolution and adaptations. Relationships between socio-ecological challenges, their health consequences and related gene-population variations and effects on growth, development, sexual maturation, reproductive investment, and senescence and health. Prerequisite: HSCI 100 or BISC 101, with a minimum grade of C-.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Pablo Nepomnaschy
May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Tue, Thu, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Tue, Thu, 5:30–6:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Tue, Thu, 5:30–6:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Tue, Thu, 5:30–6:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Tue, Thu, 6:30–7:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Tue, Thu, 6:30–7:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D106 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Tue, Thu, 6:30–7:20 p.m.
Burnaby
INDG 212 - Indigenous Perceptions of Landscape (3)

Indigenous peoples of North America possess perceptions of landscape rooted in their long history with the land. Using methods and theories designed for anthropology, archaeology, land and resource management planning and geography will bring a multi-disciplinary approach to this study of cultural landscapes. Prerequisite: INDG (or FNST) 101 or 201W. Students with credit for FNST 212 may not take this course for further credit.

INDG 232 - Introduction to Ethnoecology in Indigenous Studies (3)

Through the interdisciplinary lens of ethnoecology, this course is an exploration of ongoing, hard-earned and reciprocal relationships between people and their environment. This course considers the cultural underpinnings of perception and interaction with landscape and ecologies - as one way to appreciate issues of sustainability and diversity in a global context. Prerequisite: INDG (or FNST) 101 or 201W. Students with credit for FNST 232 may not take this course for further credit.

PLAN 100 - Introduction to Planning (3)

Students will be exposed to a broad overview of the field of planning. The course will introduce students to the role of a planner while exploring the practice of planning (human settlements and community planning) in varying contexts within Canada and internationally. Students with credit for PLAN 200 may not take this course for further credit. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
B100 Laura Tate
May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Thu, 2:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
B101 TBD
REM 100 - Global Change (3)

The Earth is experiencing the most dramatic environmental changes it has for thousands of years. How did we end up here? Provides an interdisciplinary perspective on the forces behind our ever-increasing environmental footprint. Highlights how ideologies and societal structures have shaped how we interact with the environment and explores the necessary changes for a more sustainable future. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
OL01 Sessional Instructor
Alexander Cancelli
Online
REM 200 - Introduction to Resource and Environmental Management in Canada (3)

Explores the natural and social science foundations of resource and environmental management and demonstrates how that knowledge can be used in environmental decision-making in Canada. Provides a basic understanding of the nature and management of natural resources, including Indigenous resource management issues in a Canadian context. Consideration is given to strategic thinking for environmental planning, socio-economic and biophysical trade-offs in natural resource decision-making and approaches for addressing uncertain knowledge. Prerequisite: One of REM 100, GEOG 100, GEOG 111, or EVSC 100. Breadth-Social Sci/Science.

REM 207 - Indigenous Peoples and Resource Management (3)

Explores a variety of Indigenous perspectives on resource, land and water management in British Columbia. Students are encouraged to critically analyze contemporary resource management/relationship issues (ie. energy, fisheries, forestry) from reconciliation-informed perspectives. Breadth-Social Sciences.

SEE 110 - Energy, Environment and Society (3)

Energy availability and sources, environmental consequences of energy supply and consumption, and societal impacts. Explores the environmental, economic, social, and political implications of the choices a society makes to meet its energy needs. Definitions of sustainability. Special emphasis on communication skills.

Complete one of

PLAN 300 - Planning Methods and Analysis (4)

Explores the qualitative and quantitative methods used by planners in both urban and regional settings. Students gain a basic understanding of approaches used for collecting, analyzing and communicating relevant-data between and within different communities. Introduces the roles of planners and other participants/actors in planning processes. Reviews issues in current professional planning practice and requirements for professional planning accreditation, including planners’ professional ethics and responsibility to the public interest. Prerequisite: PLAN 100 or PLAN 200.

PLAN 400 - Policy Analysis for Social and Environmental Change (4)

Provides an advanced evaluation of public policy, policy analysis, and policy change, focusing on problems in urban and regional planning and resource and environmental management. Prerequisite: PLAN 100 or PLAN 200; and 60 units.

PLAN 406 - Community Planning and Development (4)

Examines the processes and practices of considering land in municipal and regional planning settings. Topics may include the historical development of land use and spatial planning at the local level in Canada, the evolving principles and practices of land development, valuation, sustainability, resilience, and climate planning. Through alternative approaches to land via economic, policy, legal, socio-cultural and socio-environmental lenses, the course equips students to become municipal land use planners. Prerequisite: PLAN 100 or PLAN 200; and 60 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
B100 Meg Holden
May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Fri, 9:30 a.m.–1:20 p.m.
Vancouver
B101 TBD
PLAN 407 - Indigenous Governance and Resource Relationships (4)

Explores diverse Indigenous perspectives on governance, resource, land and water management, intergovernmental relations and economic development in the context of contemporary settler colonialism in Canada. Skills include critical thinking, anti-colonial, economic, political and policy analyses. Prerequisite: One of REM 207, ARCH 286, or any INDG course; and 75 units. Students with credit for REM 407 may not take this course for further credit.

or REM 407 - Indigenous Governance and Resource Relationships (4)

Explores diverse Indigenous perspectives on governance, resource, land and water management, intergovernmental relations and economic development in the context of contemporary settler colonialism in Canada. Skills include critical thinking, anti-colonial, economic, political and policy analyses. Prerequisite: One of REM 207, ARCH 286, or any INDG course; and 75 units. Students with credit for PLAN 407 may not take this course for further credit.

PLAN 408 - Environmental Planning (4)

Examines the interaction of human settlements and the natural environment in both urban and regional settings. Students gain an understanding of the decisions, policies, and plans that have profound impacts on the health and integrity of social and ecological systems. Topics may include planning for nature-based solutions, environmental justice, and resilience. Prerequisite: PLAN 100 or PLAN 200; and 60 units.

REM 350 - Energy Management for a Sustainable Climate and Society (4)

An interdisciplinary approach to transforming energy systems in pursuit of sustainable climate and society. Perspectives include thermodynamics, resource potentials, technological potentials, economic evaluation, implementation of transformative public policies, political-economy assessment of policy constraints, national and sub-national governance options, behavioural change potentials, global diplomacy, and pursuit of greater equity within and between countries. Prerequisite: 45 units. Breadth-Social Sciences.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Will Niver
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–4:20 p.m.
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
REM 355 - Sustainable Transportation for a Zero-Emissions World (3)

Explores the transportation system and how to achieve net-zero greenhouse gas emissions as well as other sustainability goals. Topics include zero-emissions vehicles, low-carbon fuels, shared mobility, vehicle automation, and reduced vehicle use. An interdisciplinary approach is followed, including analyses of environmental and resource impacts, consumer behaviour, systems, technology change, and climate policy. Prerequisite: 45 units or permission of instructor.

REM 356W - Environmental Policy (3)

Provides an overview of policy and governance approaches used to manage the natural environment from international to local levels. The history, basic concepts, and key strategies of modern environmental policy are presented and discussed. Students then analyze and critique environmental policy across scales regarding climate, forests, oceans, and urban landscapes focusing on determining the effectiveness and efficiency of different approaches to regulate and manage the environment. Prerequisite: One of REM 100, GEOG 100, GEOG 111, or EVSC 100; and 45 units. Students with credit for REM 356 may not take this course for further credit. Writing.

REM 357 - Planning for Sustainable Food Systems (3)

Provides students with the tools to identify the strengths and weaknesses of the current food system and will encourage them to critically analyze diverse solutions from both the global South and global North to build a more sustainable food system. Students will work collaboratively with the instructor to examine diverse and interdisciplinary approaches to food sustainability and strengthen their problem-solving skills. Prerequisite: 45 units. Students who have taken REM 363-3 "Special Topics" in Spring 2019 and Fall 2019 may not enroll in this course for further credit.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Tammara Soma
TBD
REM 454 - Water Security (4)

Students investigate dimensions of the global environmental crisis related to water security, including: human rights, political science, development economics, gender policies, geopolitics, regional integration and security, international law, national legislation, public health, trade, agriculture, energy generation, and water resources management. Prerequisite: 75 units and REM 100 or EVSC 100 or GEOG 100.

SD 401 - Sustainable Development Studio (4)

Engages students in creating innovative solutions to real-world challenges of sustainability and development, using studio-based approaches. Explores mechanisms for effective social and environmental change and develops policies and strategies for implementing sustainability in different locations and at different scales. Prerequisite: SD 281; one of SD 381 or SD 481; and 75 units.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Tammara Soma
TBD
SD 412 - Technologies, Cultures and a Sustainable World (3)

Technology issues relevant to global sustainable development are considered from engineering, historical and anthropological perspectives. Topics include hydroelectric dams, alternative power generation systems, and the science of climate change. In-depth case studies emphasize interdisciplinary exploration of these themes. Prerequisite: Minimum 60 units. Students may take only one of SD 412, ENSC 412 or ENV 412 for credit. Breadth-Science.

or ENSC 412 - Technologies, Cultures and a Sustainable World (3)

Technology issues relevant to global sustainable development are considered from engineering, historical and anthropological perspectives. Topics include hydroelectric dams, alternative power generation systems, and the science of climate change. In-depth case studies emphasize interdisciplinary exploration of these themes. Prerequisite: Minimum 60 units. Students may take only one of SD 412, ENSC 412 or ENV 412 for credit. Breadth-Science.

SD 491 - Directed Studies in Sustainable Development (3)

Permits SD students to expand their knowledge base and apply their critical thinking within the field of sustainable development in an area not examined in depth in regular courses. Enrollment is limited. Variable units: 1, 2, 3, 4. Prerequisite: 60 units and permission of the department.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D300 Tammara Soma
TBD
D400 Tammara Soma
TBD
SD 494 - Project in Sustainable Development (4)

Provides students an opportunity to apply ideas and models acquired in the program to a practical problem in sustainable development. Required for SCD PBD students. Certificate students must apply for special permission to take this course. Enrollment is limited. Prerequisite: Permission of the department.

SD 499 - Special Topics in Sustainable Development (4)

A specific topic within the field of sustainable development, not covered by regularly scheduled, required courses in the program. The subject matter may vary from term to term. Prerequisite: 60 units.

Transfer Credit

Transfer credit may be approved toward program fulfilment provided it meets the program's requirements for sustainable development relevance and SFU's residency requirements.

Limits

General SFU Certificate regulations apply. Units applied to one certificate may not be applied to another Simon Fraser University certificate or diploma. Those who complete the undergraduate certificate cannot enroll in the Post Baccalaureate Diploma in Sustainable Development.

More information available at www.sfu.ca/susdevprogram.html.