PLANT LIST

The plants are sorted by Latin name. Search the page to find the plant you're interested in!

Angilbas at the English Wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Acer circinatum, Latin
Vine maple, English

sic̓əɬp, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
t’eḵt’ḵáy̓, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim 

Our vine maples are planted around the Archaeology flaking pit.

Image: Curtis Clark CC BY-SA 2.5

Achillea millefolium, Latin
Western yarrow, English

--, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
--, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

 

born1945 from Hillsboro, Oregon, USA, CC BY 2.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Achlys triphylla, Latin
Vanilla leaf, English

--, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
--, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

This is growing underneath the maple, and around the hazelnut, along with bleeding hearts. The dried leaves smell like vanilla, but please don't pick them yet - we are still trying to establish colonies of this spreading ground cover.

Image: Walter Siegmund, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Adiantum aleuticum, Latin
Maidenhair fern, English

--, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
--, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

  • Black stems are used in woven basket designs.
Lazarus000, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Amelanchier alnifolia, Latin
Saskatoon/June berry, English

--, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
--, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

Our saskatoon berry is planted on the south slope to the right of the elder tree. 

Image: Danny S. CC BY-SA 3.0

Anaphalis margaritacea, Latin
Pearly everlasting, English

--, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
--, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

Our pearly everlasting is planted on the west slope of the garden. Some is above the black hawthorn, and some is above the strawberry patch along with red columbine and wooly sunflower.

Agnieszka Kwiecień, Nova, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Arctostaphylos uva-ursi, Latin
Kinnikinnick/bearberry, English

ƛ̓ik̓ʷən̓əɬp (bush), hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
tl’íkw’enay̓ (bush), sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

Image: Gilles San Martin, CC BY-SA 3.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Armeria maritima, Latin
Sea thrift, English

--, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
--, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

 

Image: Michal Klajban, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Aruncus sylvester, Latin
Goat's beard, English

--, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
--, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

Krzysztof Ziarnek, Kenraiz, CC BY-SA 4.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Athyrium filix-femina, Latin
Lady fern, English

--, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
--, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

Image: Daniel Schwen, CC BY 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Aquilegia formosa, Latin
Red columbine, English

leymtəən, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
--, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

Image: Matt Lavin from Bozeman, Montana, USA, CC BY-SA 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Bromus vulgaris, Latin
Columbia brome, English

--, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
--, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

Columbia brome is a tall native woodland grass. It is often found growing with red columbine, fringecup, and Oregon grape.

Image: Walter Siegmund, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Camassia quamash, Latin
Common camas, English

spé-nxʷ, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
spánanexw, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

Camas are part of the Garry Oak ecosystem that is primarily located now on Vancouver Island. They are frequently seen with local buttercups, california oatgrass, wooly sunflower, and yarrow. Camas have been an important root crop throughout Southern BC and the PNW of the USA. The preparation of the plant is key to its edibility.

Our camas currently looks like tiny grass growing, as we started it from seed in the Fall of 2022. It is planted between the sumac tree and the black hawthorn tree.

Robert Flogaus-Faust, CC BY 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Cerastium arvense, Latin
Field chickweed, English

--, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
--, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

The leaves are edible as a salad green.

Image: Robert Flogaus-Faust, CC BY 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Claytonia perfoliata, Latin
Miner's lettuce, English

--, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
--, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

  • The leaves are edible as a salad green throughout the growing cycle.
  • This annual reseeds itself, and can be seen all over the garden.
Image: D. Gordon E. Robertson - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0

Cornus canadensis, Latin
Bunchberry, English

--, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
--, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

  • The bunchberry is mostly found in the top corner of our garden, near the oregon grape.
  • It is in the dogwood family, and the fruit is a drupe that is edible raw or cooked.

Corylus cornuta, Latin
Beaked hazelnut, English

st̕θicəməɬp (bush), hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
ḵ’p’ax̱w (generic term for any nut), sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

  • Hazelnuts are an important food source. The nuts are delicious, and store well for the winter.
  • Our beaked hazelnut is planted next to the building, on the lower slope.
Image: CC BY-SA 4.0, Link

Crataegus douglasii, Latin
Black hawthorn, English

--, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
--, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

  • Thorns used for rakes, fish hooks
  • Berries are eaten fresh and dried, often with oil or grease
  • Our black hawthorn is planted on the west side of the garden entrance. When facing the camas, it is directly to the right.
Image: MurielBendel, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Danthonia californica, Latin
California oatgrass, English

--, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
--, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

The California oatgrass is a low-growing bunchgrass, planted near the Camas.

Image: Danny S. CC BY-SA 3.0

Dicentra formosa, Latin
Pacific bleeding heart, English

--, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
--, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

This is planted in the shade of the maple, and around the base of the hazelnut.

Image: Eugene Zelenko, CC BY-SA 4.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Dodecatheon hendersonii, Latin
Broad-leaved shooting star, English

--, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
--, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

Krzysztof Ziarnek, Kenraiz, CC BY-SA 4.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Eriophyllum lanatum, Latin
Wooly sunflower, English

--, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
--, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

Erythronium oregonum, Latin
White fawn lily, English

--, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
--, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

Erythronium revolutum, Latin
Fawn lily, English

--, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
--, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

Fragaria chiloensis, Latin
Coastal strawberry, English

--, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
--, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

The berries are delicious. They have been an important food source throughout human experience.

Image: Thayne Tuason, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Fritillaria lanceolata, Latin
Chocolate lily, English

sƛ̓ələq̓ʷ, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
lhásem, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

Also known as rice root, this plant has been an important food source for Coast Salish communities. This plant has mostly disappeared from the urban landscape of southwestern BC.

Jami Dwyer from Portland, OR, USA, CC BY-SA 2.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Gaultheria shallon, Latin
Salal, English

t̕eqeʔəɬp (bush), hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
t'áḵa7ay (bush), sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim 

The dried leaves can be used for tea.

Image: Joe Mabel, CC BY 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Holodiscus discolor, Latin
Oceanspray, English

--, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
--, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

Image: NasserHalaweh, CC BY-SA 4.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Mahonia nervosa, Latin
Dull Oregon grape, English

səniʔəɬp (bush), hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
séliy̓ay̓ (bush), sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

 

Image: Walter Siegmund, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Maianthemum racemosum (or M. amplexicaule), Latin
False Salmon's seal, English

--, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
--, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

This plant is edible, although the young shoots are most commonly consumed. Be cautious when identifying and harvesting. There are many plants that look similar and are highly toxic.

Ours is planted near the maple tree.

Image: Walter Siegmund, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Oxalis oregana, Latin
Redwood sorrel, English

--, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
--, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

Petasites frigidus, Latin
Northern sweet coltsfoot, English

--, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
--, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

  • the young leaves can be used for salad
  • mature leaves as a funnel or temporary container for berries
Image: Peter Pearsall/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Pacific Region, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Polypodium glycyrrhiza, Latin
Licorice fern, English

ƛ̓sip, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
tl’asíp (root), sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

  • The root is an important food source.
Chris Light, CC BY-SA 4.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Polystichum munitum, Latin
Swordfern, English

sθχeləm, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
tsx̱álem, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

Image: Miranda Thomas, CC BY-SA 4.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Prunella vulgaris ssp. lanceolata, Latin
Self heal, English

--, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
--, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

Image: Rasbak - Own work, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

Pteridium aquilinum, Latin
Bracken fern, English

--, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
--, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

Image: Laval University, CC BY-SA 4.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Rhus glabra, Latin
Sumac, English

--, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
--, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

The seed heads can be soaked in water to make a drink similar to lemonade, and the dried fruits can be used for tea.

Image: Dog Walking Girl CC BY-SA 3.0

Rosa nutkana, latin
Nootka Rose, English

qel̕qəɬp (bush), hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
ḵál̓ḵay (bush), sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

Walter Siegmund, CC BY-SA 3.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Rubus parviflorus, Latin
Thimbleberry, English

t̕qʷəməɬp (bush), hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
t’aḵw’emay̓ (bush), sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

The early shoots can be peeled and eaten fresh in the spring, or the plants can be left and the tart berries will be ready near the end of July.

Image: David McMaster CC BY-SA 3.0

Rubus spectabilis, Latin
Salmonberry, English

lileʔəɬp (bush), hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
yetwánay̓ (bush), sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

The edible fruits are the first to develop in the season. You may see the bright pink flowers before the plant has leaves. The young shoots are edible, and the leaves make a healing tea.

Image: Walter Siegmund CC BY-SA 3.0

Sambucus racemosa, Latin
Red elderberry, English

ťθíwəq̓ (bush), hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
ts’iwḵ’ay (bush), sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

The berries must be cooked or dried before they are eaten.

Image: brewbooks from near Seattle, USA, CC BY-SA 2.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Sedum divergens, Latin
Stonecrop, English

--, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
--, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

Sisyrinchium angustifolium (or Sisyrinchium californicum), Latin
Blue (or yellow) eyed grass, English

--, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
--, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

We have both blue and yellow, and they are planted near the light post.

Image: Laval University, CC BY-SA 4.0 , via Wikimedia Commons

Symphoricarpos albus, Latin
Snowberry, English

pəpq̓əyasəɬp (bush), hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
ts’ex̱wts’x̱wáy̓ (bush), sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

The white or pink berries are not edible.

Urtica dioica, Latin
Stinging nettle, English

t̕θəχt̕θəχ, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
ts’ex̱ts’ix̱, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

The young shoots can be picked and steamed, and the leaves can be used fresh or dried for tea. The plant does sting, but the sting goes away when the plant is dried or cooked. The fibres in the stems have also been used for cord- and thread-making, and weaving. The fabric known as ramie is made of nettle fibres.

Image: Walter Siegmund, CC BY-SA 3.0, via Wikimedia Commons

Vaccinium ovalifolium, Latin
Oval leaved blueberry, English

--, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
--, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

The berries are delicious. Blooms before the leaves emerge, early in the spring. We have one of these plants.

Vaccinium ovatum, Latin
Evergreen huckleberry, English

--, hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
--, sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

An evergreen shrub that can reach 8 feet tall. It's often found with sword fern, snowberry, thimbleberry, and red huckleberry. The berries are delicious.

We have two of these plants. Can you tell the difference between the three vaccinium species we have in the garden? How can you tell?

Image: Peter Pearsall/U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service - Pacific Region, Public domain, via Wikimedia Commons

Vaccinium parvifolium, Latin
Red huckleberry, English

skʷəqʷcsəɬp (bush), hən̓q̓əmin̓əm̓
sḵw’eḵwchsáy̓ (bush), sḵwx̱wú7mesh snichim

The berries are usually ready at the end of July. We have one of these plants in our garden.