PAST GALLERY EXHIBITS

BRINGING THE TSE'K'WA COLLECTION HOME

The Tse’K’wa Collection Exhibit is a visual display of the engagement of SFU students with Mr. Donaldson's collection which will be part of the first collection of the new Tse'K'wa Interpretive Centre at Charlie Lake.

HOMO NALEDI

Possibly the first public showing of Homo naledi. This exhibit displays 3D prints of the reconstructed skull, hand and foot of Homo naledi donated by Dr. Marina Elliot (SFU Archaeology, Alumna & Post-Doc), along with a number of resources related to the discovery and research of the puzzling new finds from Rising Star Cave in South Africa. While we do not yet have dates for the H. naledi assemblage, through comparisons with anatomically modern humans and fossil hominins, you can guess at the evolutionary relationships between these species. Compare the H. naledi skull (centre) with Homo sapiens (left) and Australopithecus africanus (right). 

Created by Dr. Barabara Winter
Note the skull cast is a composite, with the mandible from a larger individual scaled down to fit the smaller cranium of a different individual.

MAMMOTHS OF NORTH AMERICA

Teeth, tusks, bones—how do scientists reconstruct the lives and appearance of mammoths from the skeletons left behind in the ground? 'Mammoths of North America' displays real mammoth fossils from the Museum’s collection and explains how each piece of evidence recovered contributes to our knowledge of the individual and species as a whole. It also compares and contrasts the two species of mammoth that lived in North America, the Columbian and Woolly Mammoths. Finally, it looks at whether mammoths could and should be resurrected with modern technologies to walk the Earth once more.

Created by Christie Pollock

WAYANG KULIT: MASTERING THE SHADOWS

Mastering the Shadows exhibit explores the story of Ramayana and its portrayal using Wayang Shadow puppets. The Ramayana is a story about the battle between good and evil, and originated in India between 500 BCE to 100 BCE. Wayang Kulit is an important cultural tradition in Indonesia, and has been for many generations. The Wayang Kulit shadow puppets in our collection were made between 1870 and 1920, and were donated to the Museum by Dr. Ferdinand Chen and his family in 1996.

Created by Jaclyn McLeod and Janelle Berg

 

SAILING THE RED SEA
ANCIENT EGYPTIAN MARITIME EXPLORATIONS

The exhibit Sailing the Red Sea: Ancient Egyptian Martime Explorations, features the Ancient Egyptian archaeological site of Mersa/Wadi Gawasis. As you journey amongst the panels, read about Ancient Egyptian red sea traditions and explorations. While you explore the site, follow the tale of the shipwrecked sailor, a Middle Kingdom story that tells the adventure of a sailor's journey on the Red Sea to the land of Punt.

By Dr. Elizabeth Peterson. 

PLAINS REGALIA

For SFU's 50th anniversary in 2015, Tiinesha Begaye and Hilary Pennock created an exhibit of this magnificent Plains beaded costume.  It was purchased from an antique shop in Calgary in 1972 by Dr. Roy Carlson and has never been exhibited in the Museum gallery before.  Hilary and Tiinesha cleaned the costume, repaired the beading, modified a mannequin to conservation standards, mounted the costume on the mannequin and wrote the interpretive text for the large display.  A big project, well done!

Created by Tiinesha Begaye and Hilary Pennock

 

PACIFIC NORTHWEST STONE AND BONE CARVINGS

The Pacific Northwest region has some of the most studied First Nations cultures in the world. The diverse and rich cultures of this region have captivated both ethnographers and archaeologists since the beginning the disciplines. This exhibit showcases figural artifacts that were recovered from this region. Compare the art style of these ancient artifacts to the contemporary art in the large exhibit case near it (see 'Permanent Exhibits/Cultural Traditions'), or the masks on the south wall. We can see similar artistic traditions practiced over a 3,500 year span, attesting to the antiquity of the Northwest Coast art style.

Created by Duncan McLeod

ARCHIVED DIGITAL EXHIBITS

*PLEASE NOTE: These websites have been preserved for historical purposes. Some of the views and opinions expressed within these pages may have changed since their original publication.

CHARLIE LAKE CAVE
Early Human Occupation in British Columbia