Carl Beam, Untitled (detail), 1998, transfer paper, watercolour, oil pencil. SFU Art Collection. Gift of the Rosen Group, 1999.

Fabricating Meaning: Dr. Eldon Yellowhorn and Dr. J. Steven Dodge in Conversation 

Thursday, April 18, 1 - 2:30pm
SFU Gallery, AQ3004, Burnaby Campus

Language is the principle means through which we form an understanding of the world and the foundation in which social and political relations are built. Science provides a language that quantifies and objectifies, encouraging transparency and creating accessibility, when in reality, few have access. The question that emerges is how does objectivity function as a method of understanding rather than a purveyor of truth in science? How do language and narratives shape perceptions?

Dr. Eldon Yellowhorn and Dr. J. Steven Dodge will present their approaches to how language is used in science, as objective or embedded with cultural histories and subjectivities. This event, moderated by SFU Galleries Curator cheyanne turions, is in connection with the current exhibition at SFU Gallery, Ann Beam and Carl Beam: Spaces for Reading, where the artists' works question the construction of history and knowledge through systems of classification and representation.  

Dr. Yellowhorn's research work in archaeology stems from his studies of the ancient history of his Piikani ancestors. He studied plains archaeology in academic and public settings before participating in the heritage consulting industry. He is past president of the Canadian Archeological Association (2010-2012) and established the Department of First Nations Studies at SFU in 2012 where he served as Chair until 2017. 

Dr. Dodge is an experimental condensed matter physicist who specializes in the optical properties of solids. His research group works to develop the quantum theory of solids by studying how electrons in metals, electrical insulators, and superconductors respond to short pulses of laser light. He is a member of the Canadian Institute for Advanced Research Program in Quantum Materials.

Part of SFU Public Square's 2019 Community Summit, Confronting the Disinformation Age.