Fall 2020 - EDUC 816 G031

Developing Educational Programs and Practices for Diverse Educational Settings (5)

Class Number: 5152

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    TBA
    REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Investigates theories and issues associated with developing educational programs and practices in various educational contexts. Addresses the development of new programs and their implementation in schools and other educational settings.

COURSE DETAILS:

Meeting Dates:
Sep 11/12; Sep 25/26; Oct 16/17; Oct 23/24; Nov 6/7; Nov 20/21

Times:
Fridays: 4:30 - 9:00 pm
Saturdays: 8:30 - 4:30 pm  (Please note: we will not be working face-to-face online for all these hours … but consider them place holders for now)

Location:
Online – We will be using Zoom as our synchronous platform but the course is designed with a view to the online environment given our COVID reality. 

COURSE OVERVIEW

Development of educational programs can be understood in terms of both theory and practice: this course seeks to weave the two together.  Students enrolled in this course will acquire the theoretical and critical background that will enable them to develop sound and imaginative educational programs.  They will have the opportunity to confront educational programming, curriculum models, frameworks, and materials that they have had no part in developing. How to develop a critical understanding of such works, how to use them to build one’s own educational philosophy and methodology, how to study and learn from one’s own practice, and how to work on program and curriculum development with others (children, teachers, administrators, researchers, community members) – these are the central topics of the course. Frequent reference will be made to concepts and readings from prior courses in the M.Ed. program on “imagination and education.”

Assignments and grading will be discussed during our first meeting.  Assignments will likely include (but not necessarily limited to): A reflective ongoing portfolio or learning journal of some kind, an analytic paper related to the course content, some curricular design work, and a hosted presentation/series of activities project.  At least some of this work will be done in groups.  

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:

AIMS

The purpose of this course is to provide students with knowledge of key theoretical touchstones in the development of educational programs and particular curriculums.  The course will assist students to better understand, and possibly vary, those touchstones in their own practice, in a range of “alternative” educational programs, and with a particular focus on imaginative education.

Grading

NOTES:

Assignments and grading will be discussed during our first meeting.  Assignments will likely include (but not necessarily be limited to): A reflective ongoing portfolio or learning journal of some kind, an analytic paper related to the course content, some curricular design work, and a hosted presentation/series of activities project.  At least some of this work will be done in groups.  

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

Readings will be provided as the course progresses depending on how discussions move forward.  Please re-read Kieran Egan’s Educated Mind.

Kieran Egan. (1997) The Educated Mind:  How Cognitive Tools Shape Our Understanding.  University of Chicago Press, Chicago.
ISBN: 0-226-19039-0

Graduate Studies Notes:

Important dates and deadlines for graduate students are found here: http://www.sfu.ca/dean-gradstudies/current/important_dates/guidelines.html. The deadline to drop a course with a 100% refund is the end of week 2. The deadline to drop with no notation on your transcript is the end of week 3.

Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

TEACHING AT SFU IN FALL 2020

Teaching at SFU in fall 2020 will be conducted primarily through remote methods. There will be in-person course components in a few exceptional cases where this is fundamental to the educational goals of the course. Such course components will be clearly identified at registration, as will course components that will be “live” (synchronous) vs. at your own pace (asynchronous). Enrollment acknowledges that remote study may entail different modes of learning, interaction with your instructor, and ways of getting feedback on your work than may be the case for in-person classes. To ensure you can access all course materials, we recommend you have access to a computer with a microphone and camera, and the internet. In some cases your instructor may use Zoom or other means requiring a camera and microphone to invigilate exams. If proctoring software will be used, this will be confirmed in the first week of class.

Students with hidden or visible disabilities who believe they may need class or exam accommodations, including in the current context of remote learning, are encouraged to register with the SFU Centre for Accessible Learning (caladmin@sfu.ca or 778-782-3112).