Spring 2021 - GSWS 830 G200

Selected Topics Graduate Seminar I (5)

Sin to Sanctioned

Class Number: 7211

Delivery Method: In Person

Overview

  • Course Times + Location:

    Tu, Th 2:30 PM – 4:20 PM
    REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby

  • Exam Times + Location:

    Apr 25, 2021
    3:30 PM – 6:30 PM
    REMOTE LEARNING, Burnaby

Description

CALENDAR DESCRIPTION:

Selected Topics

COURSE DETAILS:

This class will examine the history of ‘illicit’ economies in North America from the 19th century to the present. Throughout the semester, we will cover several key topics, including the role of the state in trying to regulate and suppress vice economies; the experience of women and men who worked in illicit ventures such as prostitution, drug economies, and the liquor trade; and how gender and racial codes animated public debates on vice. The course will be historical in nature, but will also take an interdisciplinary perspective, drawing on readings and methodologies used in history, sociology, gender studies, critical race studies, and criminology. Throughout our course, students will engage with key debates that animated moral regulation in the modern past—and that continue to resonate today.

COURSE-LEVEL EDUCATIONAL GOALS:

For more detailed information please see the GSWS website:

http://www.sfu.ca/gsws/graduate/courses/Educational_Goals.html

Grading

  • Participation/Online Discussions: 20%
  • Conference Paper Abstract: 10%
  • Book Reviews: 40%
  • Literature Review Essay: 30%

NOTES:

Combination Synchronous and Asynchronous (select Thursdays 2:30-4:20)

Access to the Internet and a computer with microphone and webcam is required.

This class will examine the history of ‘illicit’ economies in North America from the 19th century to the present. Throughout the semester, we will cover several key topics, including the role of the state in trying to regulate and suppress vice economies; the experience of women and men who worked in illicit ventures such as prostitution, drug economies, and the liquor trade; and how gender and racial codes animated public debates on vice. The course will be historical in nature, but will also take an interdisciplinary perspective, drawing on readings and methodologies used in history, sociology, gender studies, critical race studies, and criminology. Throughout our course, students will engage with key debates that animated moral regulation in the modern past—and that continue to resonate today.

Materials

REQUIRED READING:

  • Jeffrey Weeks, Sex, Politics and Society: The Regulations of Sexuality Since 1800, Routledge 2014.
  • Elaine Carey, Women Drug Traffickers: Mules, Bosses, and Organized Crime, University of New Mexico Press, 2014.
  • Holly Karibo, Sin City North: Sex, Drugs, and Citizenship in the Detroit-Windsor Borderland, UNC Press 2015.
  • Additional materials will be posted on Canvas.

Graduate Studies Notes:

Important dates and deadlines for graduate students are found here: http://www.sfu.ca/dean-gradstudies/current/important_dates/guidelines.html. The deadline to drop a course with a 100% refund is the end of week 2. The deadline to drop with no notation on your transcript is the end of week 3.

Registrar Notes:

ACADEMIC INTEGRITY: YOUR WORK, YOUR SUCCESS

SFU’s Academic Integrity web site http://www.sfu.ca/students/academicintegrity.html is filled with information on what is meant by academic dishonesty, where you can find resources to help with your studies and the consequences of cheating.  Check out the site for more information and videos that help explain the issues in plain English.

Each student is responsible for his or her conduct as it affects the University community.  Academic dishonesty, in whatever form, is ultimately destructive of the values of the University. Furthermore, it is unfair and discouraging to the majority of students who pursue their studies honestly. Scholarly integrity is required of all members of the University. http://www.sfu.ca/policies/gazette/student/s10-01.html

TEACHING AT SFU IN SPRING 2021

Teaching at SFU in spring 2021 will be conducted primarily through remote methods. There will be in-person course components in a few exceptional cases where this is fundamental to the educational goals of the course. Such course components will be clearly identified at registration, as will course components that will be “live” (synchronous) vs. at your own pace (asynchronous). Enrollment acknowledges that remote study may entail different modes of learning, interaction with your instructor, and ways of getting feedback on your work than may be the case for in-person classes. To ensure you can access all course materials, we recommend you have access to a computer with a microphone and camera, and the internet. In some cases your instructor may use Zoom or other means requiring a camera and microphone to invigilate exams. If proctoring software will be used, this will be confirmed in the first week of class.

Students with hidden or visible disabilities who believe they may need class or exam accommodations, including in the current context of remote learning, are encouraged to register with the SFU Centre for Accessible Learning (caladmin@sfu.ca or 778-782-3112).