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To view the Spring 2024 Academic Calendar, go to www.sfu.ca/students/calendar/2024/spring.html.

Department of Biological Sciences | Faculty of Science Simon Fraser University Calendar | Summer 2024

Biological Sciences Major

Bachelor of Science

The Biological Sciences Major combines a broad foundation in the lower division with specialization in upper division. After completing their lower division courses, students select one of 3 concentrations: Cells, Molecules, Physiology (CMP); Ecology, Evolution, Conservation (EEC); or Open concentration.

Admission Requirements

Students meeting the admission requirements to the Faculty of Science may receive direct entry to the BISC Major upon acceptance to SFU either from high school or as a transfer student. Students already at SFU may apply to the BISC Major once they have completed all Lower Division Requirements (details below). Students must have a GPA of 2.0 or higher on the Lower Division Requirements to be accepted into the program.

Grade Requirements

Prerequisites. Students are normally required to obtain at least a C- on all course prerequisites, but in some cases the minimum grade requirements may be higher. Students are encouraged to plan ahead and consult the course calendar. In some cases, prerequisites may be waived for BISC courses with the approval of the Department.

Continuation. To remain in the program, students must be in good academic standing, must maintain a CGPA of 2.0 in the Major Program Requirements (i.e., excluding electives), and must not exceed SFU’s limits on course repeats. Students who do not meet these requirements will be dropped from the Major Program. Students may apply for readmission to the Major Program if they complete all Lower Division Requirements (details below) with a GPA of 2.0 or higher, without exceeding the course repeat limit. Students may also apply for admission to the General Science Double Minor Program within the Faculty of Science or other programs across the university.

Program Requirements

Students must complete a minimum of 120 units, including 44 units at the upper division level.

Lower Division Requirements

Students complete all of

BISC 101 - General Biology (4)

Introduction to the molecular, cellular and physiological mechanisms of living organisms (microorganisms, plants, animals). Lecture and lab topics include cell structure and function, flow of genetic information, enzyme function, metabolism, whole organism form and function (circulation, gas exchange, nutrition, osmoregularion). BISC 101 and 102 can be taken in either order. Prerequisite: Biology 12 (or equivalent) with a minimum grade of C (or BISC 100 with a minimum grade of C-, or BISC 113 with a minimum grade of C+, or BPK 105 with a minimum grade of C+, or HSCI 100 with a minimum grade of C+); and Chemistry 12 (or equivalent) with a minimum grade of C (or CHEM 111 with a minimum grade of C-). Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Agata Becalska
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 9:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
Burnaby
D101 Agata Becalska
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 11:30 a.m.–1:20 p.m.
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
Burnaby
D102 Agata Becalska
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 11:30 a.m.–1:20 p.m.
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
Burnaby
D103 Agata Becalska
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 11:30 a.m.–1:20 p.m.
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
Burnaby
D107 Agata Becalska
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 11:30 a.m.–1:20 p.m.
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
Burnaby
D108 Agata Becalska
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 11:30 a.m.–1:20 p.m.
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
Burnaby
D109 Agata Becalska
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 11:30 a.m.–1:20 p.m.
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
Burnaby
BISC 102 - General Biology (4)

Introduction to evolution and ecology, focusing on the processes that shape the diversity of life on earth. Lecture and lab topics include: natural selection and other mechanisms of evolutionary change, phylogeny, genetics, speciation, behaviour, species interactions, population ecology, and ecosystems. BISC 101 and 102 may be taken in either order. Prerequisite: Biology 12 (or equivalent) with a minimum grade of C (or BISC 100 with a minimum grade of C-, or BISC 113 with a minimum grade of C+, or BPK 105 with a minimum grade of C+, or HSCI 100 with a minimum grade of C+). Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Miranda Meents
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, Thu, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 1:30–4:20 p.m.
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 1:30–4:20 p.m.
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
Burnaby
D106 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 9:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
Burnaby
D107 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 1:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
Burnaby
D108 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 1:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
Burnaby
BISC 202 - Genetics (3)

Principles and concepts of transmission of genetic information. Topics include: molecular basis of inheritance, interpretation of pedigrees, chromosomal mapping, linkage, crosses, epigenetics, and the regulation and flow of genetic information from DNA to proteins. Focus on problem-solving. Prerequisite: BISC 101 and 102, both with a minimum grade of C-.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Kathleen Fitzpatrick
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, Wed, Fri, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D106 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BISC 204 - Ecology (3)

Introduces the different approaches used to study the natural world and explores ecological concepts and theory relating to animal behaviour, population dynamics, the distribution of species, structure of communities and the function of ecosystems. Prerequisite: BISC 101 and 102, both with a minimum grade of C-.

BISC 205 - Principles of Physiology (3)

An integrated exploration of animal and plant physiology, using principles from biology, physics, and chemistry to describe the underlying mechanisms and adaptations that support life. Systems include transport, metabolism, electrical and chemical signalling, sensing and responding. Prerequisite: BISC 101, BISC 102, and PHYS 101, all with a minimum grade of C-. Students who have taken BISC 305 or BISC 366 first may not then take this course for further credit.

CHEM 121 - General Chemistry and Laboratory I (4)

Atomic and molecular structure; chemical bonding; thermochemistry; elements; periodic table; gases liquids, solids, and solutions. This course includes a laboratory component. Prerequisite: Chemistry 12 with a minimum grade of C, or CHEM 109 or 111 with a minimum grade of C-. Students with credit for CHEM 120 or 125 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Paul Li
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, Wed, Fri, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D106 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D107 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D108 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D109 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D110 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D111 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D112 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D113 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D114 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
LA02 Garry Mund
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 8:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
LA03 Garry Mund
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 1:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
LB02 Garry Mund
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 8:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
LB03 Garry Mund
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 1:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
LE01 TBD
CHEM 122 - General Chemistry II (2)

Chemical equilibria; electrochemistry; chemical thermodynamics; kinetics. Students who intend to take further laboratory courses in chemistry should take CHEM 122 concurrently with CHEM 126. Prerequisite: CHEM 120 or 121 with a minimum grade of C-. Students with credit for CHEM 124 or CHEM 180 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Hogan Yu
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D106 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D108 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D109 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D110 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D111 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D112 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D113 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
CHEM 281 - Organic Chemistry and Laboratory I (4)

Structure, bonding, physical and chemical properties of simple organic compounds. Introduction to spectroscopy. Kinetics and mechanisms of organic reactions. This course includes a laboratory component. Prerequisite: CHEM 121 with a minimum grade of C-. Corequisite: CHEM 122. Students with credit for CHEM 280 or CHEM 285 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 M Khaled Arafeh
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, Wed, Fri, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D106 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D107 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D108 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D109 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D110 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D112 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
LA03 M Khaled Arafeh
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 1:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
LA06 M Khaled Arafeh
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 1:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
LB03 M Khaled Arafeh
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 1:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
LB06 M Khaled Arafeh
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 1:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
LE01 TBD
MBB 222 - Molecular Biology and Biochemistry (3)

The structure, function and synthesis of proteins, RNA and DNA and their interrelated biological functions within the cell. An introduction to molecular biology techniques and methods of protein purification and analysis. Prerequisite: or Corequisite CHEM 281.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Irina Kovalyova
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, Wed, Fri, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D106 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
MBB 231 - Cellular Biology and Biochemistry (3)

A study of the molecular processes which underlie cell structure and function, integrating ultrastructural, physiological and biochemical approaches. Modern techniques used in the analysis of organelle and cell function are integral parts of the course. Prerequisite: MBB 222, BISC 101, CHEM 281 with grades of C- or better. Corequisite or Prerequisite: CHEM 282 or CHEM 283.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Ingrid Northwood
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, Wed, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D106 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
STAT 201 - Statistics for the Life Sciences (3)

Research methodology and associated statistical analysis techniques for students with training in the life sciences. Intended to be particularly accessible to students who are not specializing in Statistics. Prerequisite: Recommended: 30 units. Students cannot obtain credit for STAT 201 if they already have credit for - or are taking concurrently - STAT 101, 203, 205, 285, or any upper division STAT course. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Brad McNeney
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 12:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
Burnaby
OL01 Wei Lin
Online
OP01 TBD

and one of

CHEM 282 - Organic Chemistry II (2)

Polyfunctional organic compounds and complex organic reactions. Introduction to natural products. Prerequisite: CHEM 281 with a minimum grade of C-. Students with credit for CHEM 283 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Uwe Kreis
May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Mon, Wed, 9:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Tue, 9:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Tue, 11:30 a.m.–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Tue, 1:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Thu, 9:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Thu, 11:30 a.m.–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D106 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Thu, 1:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D107 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Tue, 9:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D108 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Tue, 11:30 a.m.–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
CHEM 283 - Organic Chemistry IIb (3)

An advanced treatment of Organic Chemistry II. Topics include dienes and their reactivity, conjugation and aromaticity, aromatic substitution reactions, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, ketones and aldehydes, biological molecules, radical reactions, organometallic reagents, pericyclic reactions and planning multi-step synthesis. Prerequisite: CHEM 281 with a minimum grade of C-. Students with credit for CHEM 282 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Uwe Kreis
May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Mon, Wed, 9:30–11:20 a.m.
May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Fri, 9:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Thu, 9:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Jun 17, 2024: Thu, 11:30 a.m.–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby

and one of

MATH 150 - Calculus I with Review (4)

Designed for students specializing in mathematics, physics, chemistry, computing science and engineering. Topics as for Math 151 with a more extensive review of functions, their properties and their graphs. Recommended for students with no previous knowledge of Calculus. In addition to regularly scheduled lectures, students enrolled in this course are encouraged to come for assistance to the Calculus Workshop (Burnaby), or Math Open Lab (Surrey). Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus 12 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least B+, or MATH 100 with a grade of at least B-, or achieving a satisfactory grade on the Simon Fraser University Calculus Readiness Test. Students with credit for either MATH 151, 154 or 157 may not take MATH 150 for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Mahsa Faizrahnemoon
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, Wed, Fri, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 8:30–9:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
OP01 TBD
MATH 151 - Calculus I (3)

Designed for students specializing in mathematics, physics, chemistry, computing science and engineering. Logarithmic and exponential functions, trigonometric functions, inverse functions. Limits, continuity, and derivatives. Techniques of differentiation, including logarithmic and implicit differentiation. The Mean Value Theorem. Applications of differentiation including extrema, curve sketching, Newton's method. Introduction to modeling with differential equations. Polar coordinates, parametric curves. Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus 12 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least A, or MATH 100 with a grade of at least B, or achieving a satisfactory grade on the Simon Fraser University Calculus Readiness Test. Students with credit for either MATH 150, 154 or 157 may not take MATH 151 for further credit. Quantitative.

MATH 154 - Mathematics for the Life Sciences I (3)

Designed for students specializing in the life sciences. Topics include: limits, growth rate and the derivative; elementary functions, optimization and approximation methods, and their applications, integration, and differential equations; mathematical models of biological processes and their implementation and analysis using software. Prerequisite: Pre-Calculus 12 (or equivalent) with a grade of at least B, or MATH 100 with a grade of at least C-, or achieving a satisfactory grade on the Simon Fraser University Calculus Readiness Test. Students with credit for either MATH 150, 151 or 157 may not take MATH 154 for further credit. Quantitative.

and one of

PHYS 101 - Physics for the Life Sciences I (3)

Force and motion, conservation of energy and momentum, fluids, properties of soft matter and thermal physics with applications taken from the life sciences. Prerequisite: BC Principles of Physics 12 or PHYS 100 or equivalent, with a minimum grade of C-. This prerequisite may be waived, at the discretion of the department, as determined by the student's performance on a regularly scheduled PHYS 100 final exam. Please consult the physics advisor for further details. Corequisite: MATH 150 or 151 or 154 or 157; BISC 100 or 101 or 102. Recommended Corequisite: PHYS 132. Students with credit for PHYS 120, 125 or 140 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D200 Andrew Debenedictis
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, Wed, Fri, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D201 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D202 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D203 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 4:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D204 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D205 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D206 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 4:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D207 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 5:30–6:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D208 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D209 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D210 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 4:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D211 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 5:30–6:20 p.m.
Burnaby
PHYS 120 - Mechanics and Modern Physics (3)

A general calculus-based introduction to mechanics. Topics include translational and rotational motion, momentum, energy, gravitation, and selected topics in modern physics. Prerequisite: BC Principles of Physics 12 or PHYS 100 or equivalent, with a minimum grade of C-. This prerequisite may be waived, at the discretion of the department, as determined by the student's performance on a regularly scheduled PHYS 100 final exam. Please consult the physics advisor for further details. Corequisite: MATH 150 or 151 or 154. Recommended Corequisite: PHYS 132. Students with credit for PHYS 101, 125 or 140 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

PHYS 125 - Mechanics and Special Relativity (3)

A course in mechanics and modern physics designed for students who want to study translational and rotational dynamics, conservation laws, and oscillations in depth and gain additional insight into foundations of special relativity and select topics in modern physics. Prerequisite: Permission of the department. Corequisite: MATH 151. Recommended Corequisite: PHYS 132. Students with credit for PHYS 101, 120 or PHYS 140 may not take PHYS 125 for further credit. Quantitative.

PHYS 140 - Studio Physics - Mechanics and Modern Physics (4)

A general calculus-based introduction to mechanics taught in an integrated lecture-laboratory environment. Topics include translational and rotational motion, momentum, energy, gravitation, and selected topics in modern physics. Prerequisite: BC Principles of Physics 12, or PHYS 100 or equivalent, with a minimum grade of C-. Corequisite: MATH 150 or 151 or 154. Students with credit for PHYS 125 or 120 or 101 may not take this course for further credit. Quantitative/Breadth-Science.

Students are encouraged to complete all lower division requirements before registering for upper division courses. Students who intend to apply for medical, dental, veterinary, or other professional program may need additional courses and are encouraged to consult with the Biological Sciences Undergraduate Advisor.

Upper Division Requirements

Students complete a minimum of 12 upper division courses (a minimum of 36 units), consisting of three core courses plus nine concentration specific courses, as specified below. Once students have completed their lower division requirements, they should meet with the Undergraduate Advisor to declare their concentration. Students must obtain a C- or better on all Upper Division Requirements.

All students complete three core courses, as follows.

BISC 300 - Evolution (3)

The phenomenon of organic evolution, and the major processes leading to changes in allele frequencies over time, namely mutation, migration, genetic drift and natural selection. Topics include evolutionary genetics, adaptation, sexual selection, the origin of life, speciation, and the major evolutionary trends over geological time. Prerequisite: BISC 202 with a minimum grade of C-. Recommended: BISC 204.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Philippe Fernandez-Fournier
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, Wed, Fri, 12:30–1:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 10:30–11:20 a.m.
Burnaby
D105 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BISC 333 - Developmental Biology (3)

Embryonic and post-embryonic development of vertebrates, invertebrates, and plants, with a focus on both classical and modern experimental approaches. Common and distinct features of the genes and signalling pathways that control development will be compared at the organismal, cellular, molecular and genetic levels. Prerequisite: BISC 202, MBB 222, and MBB 231, all with a minimum grade of C-.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Kathleen Fitzpatrick
Lisa Julian
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, Wed, Fri, 11:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D104 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby

and at least one of

BISC 303 - Microbiology (4)

A broad introduction to micro-organisms (bacteria, viruses and archaea) with an emphasis on their molecular biology, metabolism, physiology, and interactions with their hosts and environment. Labs introduce students to modern microbial techniques. Prerequisite: BISC 102, MBB 222, and MBB 231, all with a minimum grade of C-.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Julian Guttman
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, Thu, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
LAB1 Peter Hollmann
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, Thu, 10:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
LAB2 Peter Hollmann
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, Thu, 1:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
LAB3 Peter Hollmann
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, Thu, 3:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BISC 306 - Invertebrate Biology (4)

An introduction to invertebrate phyla, with a focus on marine taxa. Labs include examination of live animals, dissections, and preserved specimens. Prerequisite: BISC 101, 102, and (BISC 204 or GEOG 215), all with a minimum grade of C-.

BISC 316 - Vertebrate Biology (4)

An overview of the evolution and diversity of vertebrates, with an emphasis on the evolutionary innovations and characteristics that led to this diversity. Labs explore comparative anatomy through dissections, bones, and other specimens. Prerequisite: BISC 101 and 102, both with a minimum grade of C-.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Erin Barley (Lecture and Lab)
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, Wed, Fri, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
LAB1 Erin Barley
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 1:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
LAB2 Erin Barley
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 1:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
LAB3 Erin Barley
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 1:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BISC 317 - Insect Biology (3)

An introduction to insect classification, body plan, post-embryonic development, and systems: circulatory, ventilatory, digestive, and sensory. Labs focus on comparative morphology, collection, identification, and preservation of specimens. Prerequisite: BISC 101 and 102, both with a minimum grade of C-.

BISC 318 - Parasitology (3)

Ecology, morphology, and phylogeny of animal parasites (from protozoa to helminthes), including those of humans, domestic animals and wildlife. Lecture and lab topics include: parasite success, host-parasite interactions, principles of parasitic infections, parasite reproduction and transmission, as host responses and medical options for past and current parasite problems. Prerequisite: BISC 101, 102, and (BISC 204 or HSCI 212), all with a minimum grade of C-.

BISC 327 - Algal Biology (4)

Lectures and labs provide a survey of the major groups of algae, including cyanobacteria and other microscopic algae, seaweeds and freshwater algae. Addresses aspects of evolution, taxonomy, ecology, anatomy, life history, and the importance of algae in our lives. Prerequisite: BISC 101 and 102, both with a minimum grade of C-. Students who have taken BISC 326 first may not then take this course for further credit.

BISC 328 - Fungal Biology and Ecology (3)

Lectures and labs provide an overview of the fungi including their identification and ecological roles, with emphasis on molds and mushrooms. Topics include: identification using morphological and molecular techniques, roles in natural and agricultural ecosystems, and the uses and detrimental effects of fungi in food production and medicine. Prerequisite: BISC 101 and 102, both with a minimum grade of C-. Recommended: BISC 204. Students who have taken BISC 326 first may not then take this course for further credit.

BISC 337 - Plant Biology (4)

A survey and comparison of the major plant groups including their origins, evolution, anatomy, life histories, and impacts on human society. Labs emphasize microscopy and observation of plant specimens. Prerequisite: BISC 101 and 102, both with a minimum grade of C-.

Cells, Molecules, and Physiology (CMP) Concentration

This concentration is for students who wish to specialize in Cell Biology, Molecular Biology, and Physiology. The program provides flexibility for students to pursue their interests across these disciplines.

Students who choose this concentration will complete two of the following techniques courses

BISC 302W - Genetic Analysis (3)

Students analyze different types of genetic data (e.g., genetic crosses, chromosome rearrangements, STR, RFLP) and use lab techniques (e.g., PCR, restriction digest, and gel electrophoresis) to solve case studies and genetics problems. Prerequisite: BISC 202 and MBB 222, both with a minimum grade of C-. Writing.

BISC 303 - Microbiology (4)

A broad introduction to micro-organisms (bacteria, viruses and archaea) with an emphasis on their molecular biology, metabolism, physiology, and interactions with their hosts and environment. Labs introduce students to modern microbial techniques. Prerequisite: BISC 102, MBB 222, and MBB 231, all with a minimum grade of C-.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Julian Guttman
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, Thu, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
LAB1 Peter Hollmann
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, Thu, 10:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
LAB2 Peter Hollmann
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, Thu, 1:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
LAB3 Peter Hollmann
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, Thu, 3:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BISC 357 - Genetic Engineering (4)

The use of genetic engineering to evaluate and alter gene function is introduced in lectures and practiced in labs. Lectures cover bioinformatics, gene editing, and genome sequencing. Lab projects include a series of cloning techniques from nucleic acid extraction to making novel gene constructs. Prerequisite: BISC 202, MBB 222, and MBB 231, all with a minimum grade of C-. Recommended: MBB 331. Students with credit for MBB 308 may not take this course for further credit.

BPK 408W - Cellular Physiology Laboratory (4)

An advanced laboratory course in cellular physiological techniques providing students with theoretical and practical training in cellular physiology laboratory techniques such as DNA and RNA manipulation and quantification, immunofluorescence imaging of protein expression, tissue contraction studies and recording of nerve action potentials and modulation. Prerequisite: STAT 201 and BPK 305 for BPK majors or STAT 201 and one of BISC 305, 405, or 455 with a C- or better for BISC majors. Enrollment of non-BPK and non-BISC majors require permission of the instructor. Writing.

and at least five additional stream electives from

BISC 302W - Genetic Analysis (3)

Students analyze different types of genetic data (e.g., genetic crosses, chromosome rearrangements, STR, RFLP) and use lab techniques (e.g., PCR, restriction digest, and gel electrophoresis) to solve case studies and genetics problems. Prerequisite: BISC 202 and MBB 222, both with a minimum grade of C-. Writing.

BISC 303 - Microbiology (4)

A broad introduction to micro-organisms (bacteria, viruses and archaea) with an emphasis on their molecular biology, metabolism, physiology, and interactions with their hosts and environment. Labs introduce students to modern microbial techniques. Prerequisite: BISC 102, MBB 222, and MBB 231, all with a minimum grade of C-.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Julian Guttman
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, Thu, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
LAB1 Peter Hollmann
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, Thu, 10:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
LAB2 Peter Hollmann
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, Thu, 1:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
LAB3 Peter Hollmann
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, Thu, 3:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BISC 305 - Animal Physiology (3)

A study of the major physiological systems, with an emphasis on understanding the biophysical properties underpinning physiological mechanisms. Prerequisite: (BISC 205 or BPK 205) and MBB 231, both with a minimum grade of C-.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Inigo Novales Flamarique
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 2:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BISC 313 - Environmental Toxicology: A Mechanistic Perspective (3)

An introduction to the environmental and biological fate of chemicals, their mechanisms of action, testing, evaluation, and risk assessment. Students are introduced to different classes of environmental contaminants, and examine how they affect various organisms (including humans) at the molecular, biochemical, organ system, and behavioural levels of biological organization. Prerequisite: BISC 101 and (BISC 204, or BISC 205, or GEOG 215, or MBB 231), both with a minimum grade of C-.

BISC 357 - Genetic Engineering (4)

The use of genetic engineering to evaluate and alter gene function is introduced in lectures and practiced in labs. Lectures cover bioinformatics, gene editing, and genome sequencing. Lab projects include a series of cloning techniques from nucleic acid extraction to making novel gene constructs. Prerequisite: BISC 202, MBB 222, and MBB 231, all with a minimum grade of C-. Recommended: MBB 331. Students with credit for MBB 308 may not take this course for further credit.

BISC 366 - Plant Physiology (3)

The physiological and developmental mechanisms underlying the growth and survival of plants in their environments, including traits of key importance in plant production. Prerequisite: BISC 205 and MBB 231, both with a minimum grade of C-.

BISC 403 - Current Topics in Cell Biology (3)

The lectures will explore two or three major themes in current cell biology, such as cell motility, the cell cycle, and cellular signalling. A critical component of the course is to develop an understanding of the experimental basis of our knowledge about cells. Prerequisite: MBB 222 and 231, both with a minimum grade of C-; and at least 75 units (or permission of the instructor). Recommended: BISC 205 or BPK 205.

BISC 405 - Neurobiology (3)

Neuroscience, focusing on physiological, cellular and molecular mechanisms. Topics include: cellular and subcellular organization of the nervous system, electrical properties of neurons, ion channels, synaptic transmission, sensory systems, learning and memory, neurodegenerative diseases. Prerequisite: Students complete one of: (BISC 205 and MBB 231), or (BPK 205 and MBB 231), or BPK 306, or HSCI 321; each with a minimum grade of C-.

BISC 421 - Models in Biology: From Molecules to Migration (3)

Students are introduced to models and simulations for biological systems at the ecosystem, organismal, cellular, and molecular levels. They will discover how to design and use models, and will then apply these skills to build their own model using basic mathematical tools (e.g., Excel, other software). Prerequisite: BISC 100, 101, or 102, with a minimum grade of C-; and MATH 154 (or equivalent) with a minimum grade of B; and at least 60 units; or permission of the instructor. Quantitative.

BISC 423 - Developmental Neurobiology (3)

All aspects of neuronal development from the specification of neurons in the early embryo to the formation and maturation of neuronal circuits. Both invertebrate and vertebrate model organisms will be studied with emphasis on the molecular basis of nervous system development. Prerequisite: BISC 202, MBB 222, and MBB 231, all with a minimum grade of C-. Recommended: BISC 333 or MBB 331.

BISC 424 - Applied Genomics (3)

The course provides an overview of "omics" methods in large-scale identification of gene functions in various organisms, and demonstrates how this knowledge can be applied in genomics fields, including plant and animal breeding. Prerequisite: BISC 202, MBB 222, MBB 231, and (BISC 357 or MBB 331), all with a minimum grade of C-.

BISC 425 - Sensory Biology (3)

An overview of the major sensory mechanisms underlying animal behaviour. This course examines the basic physiological mechanisms underlying various mammalian and non-mammalian senses including vision, audition, olfaction, gustation, polarization sensitivity and mechanoreception. Lectures combine concepts from physics, systems neuroscience, cell and molecular biology, and behaviour. Prerequisite: (BISC 205 or BPK 205) and MBB 231, both with a minimum grade of C-.

BISC 428 - Cell Anatomy (3)

This course provides students with an advanced, detailed understanding of a variety of cell biological topics with particular attention given to the cytoskeleton, intercellular junctions, vesicle trafficking and post-translational modifications of proteins associated with those topics. Students will also be exposed to the history of cell biology throughout the course. Prerequisite: BISC 101, BISC 102, MBB 222, and MBB 231, all with a minimum grade of C-. Students who have completed BISC 472 under the title "Advanced Cell Biology" may not take this course for further credit.

BISC 430 - Microbe-Plant Interactions (3)

Interactions between major groups of microbes (including fungi, bacteria, viruses, phytoplasmas and viroids) with higher plants, including the chemical signals which trigger the onset of recognition events that result in a parasitic or mutualistic relationship, and the mechanisms of plant defense. Prerequisite: MBB 231 and (BISC 303, or BISC 328, or BISC 337, or BISC 366), both with a minimum grade of C-.

BISC 433 - Environmental Microbiology (3)

An overview of environmental and applied microbiology. Topics include microbial growth and kinetics, microbial metabolism and thermodynamics, biogeochemical cycling, microbial ecology, and applied microbiology. Includes computer labs, where students will learn to analyze data generated by modern methods used to characterize microbes and microbial communities. Prerequisite: MBB 222, MBB 231, and BISC 303, all with a minimum grade of C-. Students with credit for BISC 475 under the title "Environmental Microbiology" may not take this course for further credit.

BISC 445 - Environmental Physiology of Animals (3)

A discussion of the physiological mechanisms and adaptations which permit animals to live in diverse environments. The course will adopt a comparative approach to physiology. Prerequisite: BISC 205 and MBB 231, both with a minimum grade of C-.

BISC 447 - Stem Cells - Current Trends (3)

Foundational biology of stem cell populations, technological advances, current and potential therapeutic applications. Prerequisite: MBB 322 or BISC 333, with a minimum grade of C. Students with credit for MBB 447 may not take this course for further credit. Students with credit for MBB 440 or BISC 472 under the title "Stem Cell Biology and Applications" may not take this course for further credit.

BISC 455 - Endocrinology (3)

Physiological function of neuroendocrine and hormonal systems in invertebrates and vertebrates (and a little bit on plants). The course examines endocrinology from the molecular to whole-organismal level, with a focus on reproduction, obesity, and stress. Prerequisite: BISC 205, MBB 231, and (BISC 306 or BISC 316), all with a minimum grade of C-.

BISC 457 - Plant Molecular Biology and Biotechnology (3)

An introduction to plant molecular biology and the techniques, applications and issues of plant genetic engineering. Prerequisite: BISC 202, MBB 222, and MBB 231, all with a minimum grade of C-.

BISC 471 - Special Topics in Cells, Molecules and Physiology (3)

Special Topics in Cells, Molecules and Physiology not currently offered in the Department of Biological Science. Prerequisite: To be announced.

BISC 472 - Special Topics in Cells, Molecules and Physiology (3)

Selected topics in areas not currently offered within the undergraduate course offerings in the Department of Biological Sciences. Prerequisite: To be announced.

BISC 475 - Special Topics in Biology (3)

Selected topics not currently offered in the Department of Biological Sciences. Prerequisite: To be announced.

BISC 497W - Undergraduate Research: Writing Intensive (3)

Directed study, and research or scientific communication, in an area of biology or biological pedagogy. A student may enroll in this course only with prior written agreement of a faculty member to act as a research supervisor, who will also provide instruction and feedback on the writing and presentation of results from the research. Prerequisite: Completion of lower division course requirements. Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D001 Sherryl Bisgrove
TBD
D002 Gerhard Gries
TBD
D003 Leah Bendell
TBD
D004 Kathleen Fitzpatrick
TBD
D005 TBD
BISC 498 - Undergraduate Research I (3)

Directed study, and research or scientific communication, in an area of biology or biological pedagogy. A student may enroll in this course only with prior written agreement of a faculty member to act as a research supervisor. Prerequisite: Completion of lower division course requirements.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D010 Chris Kennedy
TBD
D011 Leah Bendell
TBD
D012 David Green
TBD
D013 Wendy Palen
TBD
D014 Vicki Marlatt
TBD
D015 Gerhard Gries
TBD
D016 Inigo Novales Flamarique
TBD
BISC 499 - Undergraduate Research II (3)

Directed study, and research or scientific communication, in an area of biology or biological pedagogy. A student may enroll in this course only with prior written agreement of a faculty member to act as a research supervisor. Prerequisite: Completion of lower division course requirements.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D001 Michel Leroux
TBD
D002 Gordon Rintoul
TBD
D003 Sherryl Bisgrove
TBD
D004 Inigo Novales Flamarique
TBD
D010 TBD
BPK 408W - Cellular Physiology Laboratory (4)

An advanced laboratory course in cellular physiological techniques providing students with theoretical and practical training in cellular physiology laboratory techniques such as DNA and RNA manipulation and quantification, immunofluorescence imaging of protein expression, tissue contraction studies and recording of nerve action potentials and modulation. Prerequisite: STAT 201 and BPK 305 for BPK majors or STAT 201 and one of BISC 305, 405, or 455 with a C- or better for BISC majors. Enrollment of non-BPK and non-BISC majors require permission of the instructor. Writing.

and two upper division elective courses (minimum of six units) from BISC, BPK, HSCI, MBB, PHYS, or STAT, subject to approval by the department. Normally no more than two research intensive courses (such as BISC 497W, 498, or 499) may be used to satisfy stream requirements. Students complete a total of five lab courses (which may include one of BISC 497W, 498, 499) among their upper division courses. A minimum of 3 CMP stream courses must be at the 400 level.

Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation (EEC) Concentration

This concentration integrates theoretical and applied approaches to Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation. Students interested in obtaining additional field biology experience may also take courses at Bamfield Marine Sciences Centre, listed under Marine Sciences (MASC) in the course calendar. The EEC concentration is accredited by the College of Applied Biology (see the Biological Sciences website for details).

Students who choose this concentration will complete both

STAT 302 - Analysis of Experimental and Observational Data (3)

The standard techniques of multiple regression analysis, analysis of variance, and analysis of covariance, and their role in observational and experimental studies. This course may not be used to satisfy the upper division requirements of the following programs: statistics major, statistics honours, actuarial science major, and actuarial science honours. Prerequisite: One of STAT 201, STAT 203, STAT 205, STAT 270, BUS 232, or ECON 233, with a minimum grade of C-. Students who have taken STAT 350 first may not then take the course for further credit. Quantitative.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Brad McNeney
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 2:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
Burnaby
OL01 Gamage Perera
Online
OP01 TBD
BISC 360W - Techniques in Ecology and Evolution (3)

A practical lab- and field-based introduction to techniques in ecology and evolution. Students use experimental design and statistical methods to collect, analyze, and interpret data. Specific topics may include: sampling and describing communities, evaluating spatial patterns, investigating animal behaviour, population estimation, and estimating competition. Prerequisite: BISC 202, (BISC 204 or GEOG 215), and STAT 201, all with a minimum grade of C-. Writing.

and at least one additional organismal course from

BISC 306 - Invertebrate Biology (4)

An introduction to invertebrate phyla, with a focus on marine taxa. Labs include examination of live animals, dissections, and preserved specimens. Prerequisite: BISC 101, 102, and (BISC 204 or GEOG 215), all with a minimum grade of C-.

BISC 316 - Vertebrate Biology (4)

An overview of the evolution and diversity of vertebrates, with an emphasis on the evolutionary innovations and characteristics that led to this diversity. Labs explore comparative anatomy through dissections, bones, and other specimens. Prerequisite: BISC 101 and 102, both with a minimum grade of C-.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Erin Barley (Lecture and Lab)
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Mon, Wed, Fri, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
LAB1 Erin Barley
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, 1:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
LAB2 Erin Barley
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 1:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
LAB3 Erin Barley
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Thu, 1:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BISC 317 - Insect Biology (3)

An introduction to insect classification, body plan, post-embryonic development, and systems: circulatory, ventilatory, digestive, and sensory. Labs focus on comparative morphology, collection, identification, and preservation of specimens. Prerequisite: BISC 101 and 102, both with a minimum grade of C-.

BISC 327 - Algal Biology (4)

Lectures and labs provide a survey of the major groups of algae, including cyanobacteria and other microscopic algae, seaweeds and freshwater algae. Addresses aspects of evolution, taxonomy, ecology, anatomy, life history, and the importance of algae in our lives. Prerequisite: BISC 101 and 102, both with a minimum grade of C-. Students who have taken BISC 326 first may not then take this course for further credit.

BISC 328 - Fungal Biology and Ecology (3)

Lectures and labs provide an overview of the fungi including their identification and ecological roles, with emphasis on molds and mushrooms. Topics include: identification using morphological and molecular techniques, roles in natural and agricultural ecosystems, and the uses and detrimental effects of fungi in food production and medicine. Prerequisite: BISC 101 and 102, both with a minimum grade of C-. Recommended: BISC 204. Students who have taken BISC 326 first may not then take this course for further credit.

BISC 337 - Plant Biology (4)

A survey and comparison of the major plant groups including their origins, evolution, anatomy, life histories, and impacts on human society. Labs emphasize microscopy and observation of plant specimens. Prerequisite: BISC 101 and 102, both with a minimum grade of C-.

and at least one applied course from

BISC 308 - Environmental Toxicology: An Ecological Perspective (3)

Students are introduced to the major environmental toxicants, their sources, and interactions with terrestrial and aquatic environments. Through historical and current case studies of environmental toxicants, this course will provide an understanding of the basic principles of environmental toxicology particularly as they apply to populations, communities and ecosystems. Prerequisite: BISC 101, 102, and (BISC 204 or GEOG 215), all with a minimum grade of C-.

BISC 309 - Conservation Biology (3)

An examination of the primary threats to biodiversity, how biological processes contribute to the persistence of populations and structure of communities, and species and landscape approaches to conservation in the real world. Prerequisite: BISC 204 with a minimum grade of C-.

BISC 413 - Fisheries Ecology (3)

Fisheries from an ecological point of view, whereby the principles of population dynamics, behaviour, competition and predator-prey relationships are applied to conservation and management of the world's fisheries. Prerequisite: BISC 204 with a minimum grade of C-.

and at least five additional stream electives from

BISC 305 - Animal Physiology (3)

A study of the major physiological systems, with an emphasis on understanding the biophysical properties underpinning physiological mechanisms. Prerequisite: (BISC 205 or BPK 205) and MBB 231, both with a minimum grade of C-.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Inigo Novales Flamarique
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 3:30–4:20 p.m.
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 2:30–4:20 p.m.
Burnaby
Burnaby
D101 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D102 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Wed, 2:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
D103 May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Fri, 1:30–2:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BISC 308 - Environmental Toxicology: An Ecological Perspective (3)

Students are introduced to the major environmental toxicants, their sources, and interactions with terrestrial and aquatic environments. Through historical and current case studies of environmental toxicants, this course will provide an understanding of the basic principles of environmental toxicology particularly as they apply to populations, communities and ecosystems. Prerequisite: BISC 101, 102, and (BISC 204 or GEOG 215), all with a minimum grade of C-.

BISC 309 - Conservation Biology (3)

An examination of the primary threats to biodiversity, how biological processes contribute to the persistence of populations and structure of communities, and species and landscape approaches to conservation in the real world. Prerequisite: BISC 204 with a minimum grade of C-.

BISC 366 - Plant Physiology (3)

The physiological and developmental mechanisms underlying the growth and survival of plants in their environments, including traits of key importance in plant production. Prerequisite: BISC 205 and MBB 231, both with a minimum grade of C-.

BISC 407 - Population Dynamics (3)

An evaluation of factors influencing the natural fluctuation and regulation of plant and animal population numbers. Prerequisite: BISC 102, (BISC 204 or GEOG 215), and MATH 154, all with a minimum grade of C-.

BISC 410 - Behavioral Ecology (3)

Behavioural ecologists study the evolutionary causes and ecological consequences of behaviour. This course explores theories developed to explain group-living, foraging decisions, signalling, mate choice and reproductive strategies, and provides an opportunity to develop novel hypotheses for (and design experiments to test) why animals, including humans, behave the way they do. Prerequisite: BISC 102 and (BISC 204 or GEOG 215), both with a minimum grade of C-.

BISC 412 - Aquatic Ecology (3)

The scientific study of marine and freshwater ecosystems. Through lecture and field/lab components, the course will examine a combination of fundamental concepts of aquatic ecology as well as challenges posed to these ecosystems by environmental change. Students will gain hands-on experience with data collection, analysis, and communication. Prerequisite: BISC 101, 102, and (BISC 204 or GEOG 215), all with a minimum grade of C-.

BISC 413 - Fisheries Ecology (3)

Fisheries from an ecological point of view, whereby the principles of population dynamics, behaviour, competition and predator-prey relationships are applied to conservation and management of the world's fisheries. Prerequisite: BISC 204 with a minimum grade of C-.

BISC 414 - Limnology (3)

An integrated examination of biological, chemical and physical processes in lakes and running water ecosystems. Lectures and labs emphasize interactions among biological, chemical, and physical controls on the structure, function, and dynamics of aquatic ecosystems. Environmental problems resulting from human disturbances to aquatic ecosystems are examined. Prerequisite: BISC 204 or GEOG 215, with a minimum grade of C-.

BISC 420 - Community Ecology (3)

Community ecologists study large-scale patterns in biodiversity and the processes that influence the structure and function of communities. This course introduces concepts and theories central to community ecology, with a focus on observations, hypotheses, experiments and quantitative models, and explores applications of community ecology to emerging problems in human-dominated ecosystems. Prerequisite: BISC 204 or GEOG 215, with a minimum grade of C-.

BISC 421 - Models in Biology: From Molecules to Migration (3)

Students are introduced to models and simulations for biological systems at the ecosystem, organismal, cellular, and molecular levels. They will discover how to design and use models, and will then apply these skills to build their own model using basic mathematical tools (e.g., Excel, other software). Prerequisite: BISC 100, 101, or 102, with a minimum grade of C-; and MATH 154 (or equivalent) with a minimum grade of B; and at least 60 units; or permission of the instructor. Quantitative.

BISC 422 - Population Genetics (3)

The heritable genetic basis for biological variation among populations. Concepts emphasize models (from theory), estimators (using data), and assumptions (via simulation). Topics focus on the Big Five: mutation, recombination, genetic drift, gene flow, and natural selection. Prerequisite: BISC 202 and STAT 201, both with a minimum grade of C-. Recommended: BISC 300.

BISC 433 - Environmental Microbiology (3)

An overview of environmental and applied microbiology. Topics include microbial growth and kinetics, microbial metabolism and thermodynamics, biogeochemical cycling, microbial ecology, and applied microbiology. Includes computer labs, where students will learn to analyze data generated by modern methods used to characterize microbes and microbial communities. Prerequisite: MBB 222, MBB 231, and BISC 303, all with a minimum grade of C-. Students with credit for BISC 475 under the title "Environmental Microbiology" may not take this course for further credit.

BISC 440W - Biodiversity (3)

Considers the production and organization of biodiversity, the evolutionary and ecological theories behind temporal and spatial patterns of biodiversity, and the values society gives biodiversity. Computer labs introduce students to phylogenetic and comparative analyses using the program R. Prerequisite: BISC 300 and STAT 201, both with a minimum grade of C+, and (75 units or permission of the instructor). Writing.

BISC 441 - Evolution of Health and Disease (3)

Application of the principles and theories of evolution and ecology to understanding the study of health and disease, with an emphasis on humans. Topics to be covered include the evolutionary ecology of infectious disease, the immune system, cancer, senescence, fetal programming, and the genetic/environmental bases of disease. Prerequisite: BISC 202 or 204, both with a minimum grade of C-. Recommended: BISC 300.

BISC 445 - Environmental Physiology of Animals (3)

A discussion of the physiological mechanisms and adaptations which permit animals to live in diverse environments. The course will adopt a comparative approach to physiology. Prerequisite: BISC 205 and MBB 231, both with a minimum grade of C-.

BISC 473 - Special Topics in Ecology, Evolution and Conservation (3)

Selected topics in Ecology, Evolution and Conservation not currently offered in the Department of Biological Science. Prerequisite: To be announced.

BISC 474 - Special Topics in Ecology, Evolution and Conservation (3)

Selected topics in Ecology, Evolution and Conservation not currently offered in the Department of Biological Science. Prerequisite: To be announced.

BISC 497W - Undergraduate Research: Writing Intensive (3)

Directed study, and research or scientific communication, in an area of biology or biological pedagogy. A student may enroll in this course only with prior written agreement of a faculty member to act as a research supervisor, who will also provide instruction and feedback on the writing and presentation of results from the research. Prerequisite: Completion of lower division course requirements. Writing.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D001 Sherryl Bisgrove
TBD
D002 Gerhard Gries
TBD
D003 Leah Bendell
TBD
D004 Kathleen Fitzpatrick
TBD
D005 TBD
BISC 498 - Undergraduate Research I (3)

Directed study, and research or scientific communication, in an area of biology or biological pedagogy. A student may enroll in this course only with prior written agreement of a faculty member to act as a research supervisor. Prerequisite: Completion of lower division course requirements.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D010 Chris Kennedy
TBD
D011 Leah Bendell
TBD
D012 David Green
TBD
D013 Wendy Palen
TBD
D014 Vicki Marlatt
TBD
D015 Gerhard Gries
TBD
D016 Inigo Novales Flamarique
TBD
BISC 499 - Undergraduate Research II (3)

Directed study, and research or scientific communication, in an area of biology or biological pedagogy. A student may enroll in this course only with prior written agreement of a faculty member to act as a research supervisor. Prerequisite: Completion of lower division course requirements.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D001 Michel Leroux
TBD
D002 Gordon Rintoul
TBD
D003 Sherryl Bisgrove
TBD
D004 Inigo Novales Flamarique
TBD
D010 TBD

Courses from other units such as the Faculty of Environment and MASC courses may count as options toward these stream electives, subject to approval by the department. Students complete a total of five lab courses (which may include one of BISC 497W, 498, 499) among their upper division courses. A minimum of three EEC stream courses must be at the 400-level.

Open Concentration

This concentration allows students to build their own program and combine interests spanning the full diversity of courses offered in the Department.

Students who choose this concentration will complete one of the following techniques courses

BISC 302W - Genetic Analysis (3)

Students analyze different types of genetic data (e.g., genetic crosses, chromosome rearrangements, STR, RFLP) and use lab techniques (e.g., PCR, restriction digest, and gel electrophoresis) to solve case studies and genetics problems. Prerequisite: BISC 202 and MBB 222, both with a minimum grade of C-. Writing.

BISC 303 - Microbiology (4)

A broad introduction to micro-organisms (bacteria, viruses and archaea) with an emphasis on their molecular biology, metabolism, physiology, and interactions with their hosts and environment. Labs introduce students to modern microbial techniques. Prerequisite: BISC 102, MBB 222, and MBB 231, all with a minimum grade of C-.

Section Instructor Day/Time Location
D100 Julian Guttman
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, Thu, 9:30–10:20 a.m.
Burnaby
LAB1 Peter Hollmann
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, Thu, 10:30 a.m.–12:20 p.m.
Burnaby
LAB2 Peter Hollmann
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, Thu, 1:30–3:20 p.m.
Burnaby
LAB3 Peter Hollmann
May 6 – Aug 2, 2024: Tue, Thu, 3:30–5:20 p.m.
Burnaby
BISC 357 - Genetic Engineering (4)

The use of genetic engineering to evaluate and alter gene function is introduced in lectures and practiced in labs. Lectures cover bioinformatics, gene editing, and genome sequencing. Lab projects include a series of cloning techniques from nucleic acid extraction to making novel gene constructs. Prerequisite: BISC 202, MBB 222, and MBB 231, all with a minimum grade of C-. Recommended: MBB 331. Students with credit for MBB 308 may not take this course for further credit.

BISC 360W - Techniques in Ecology and Evolution (3)

A practical lab- and field-based introduction to techniques in ecology and evolution. Students use experimental design and statistical methods to collect, analyze, and interpret data. Specific topics may include: sampling and describing communities, evaluating spatial patterns, investigating animal behaviour, population estimation, and estimating competition. Prerequisite: BISC 202, (BISC 204 or GEOG 215), and STAT 201, all with a minimum grade of C-. Writing.

BPK 408W - Cellular Physiology Laboratory (4)

An advanced laboratory course in cellular physiological techniques providing students with theoretical and practical training in cellular physiology laboratory techniques such as DNA and RNA manipulation and quantification, immunofluorescence imaging of protein expression, tissue contraction studies and recording of nerve action potentials and modulation. Prerequisite: STAT 201 and BPK 305 for BPK majors or STAT 201 and one of BISC 305, 405, or 455 with a C- or better for BISC majors. Enrollment of non-BPK and non-BISC majors require permission of the instructor. Writing.

and an additional 8 upper division BISC courses (totaling a minimum of 24 units). Students may substitute up to 2 upper division courses from other units (e.g., BPK, FENV, HSCI, MASC, MBB, PHYS, or STAT), subject to approval by the department. Normally no more than two research intensive courses (such as BISC 497W, 498, or 499) may be used to satisfy stream requirements. Students complete a total of five lab courses (which may include one of BISC 497W, 498, 499) among their upper division courses. A minimum of 3 BISC courses must be at the 400 level.

University Degree Requirements

Students must also satisfy University degree requirements for degree completion.

Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements

Students admitted to Simon Fraser University beginning in the fall 2006 term must meet writing, quantitative and breadth requirements as part of any degree program they may undertake. See Writing, Quantitative, and Breadth Requirements for university-wide information.

WQB Graduation Requirements

A grade of C- or better is required to earn W, Q or B credit

Requirement

Units

Notes
W - Writing

6

Must include at least one upper division course, taken at Simon Fraser University within the student's major subject; two courses (minimum three units each)

Q - Quantitative

6

Q courses may be lower or upper division; two courses (total six units or more)
B - Breadth

18

Designated Breadth

Must be outside the student's major subject, and may be lower or upper division:

Two courses (total six units or more) Social Sciences: B-Soc
Two courses (total six units or more) Humanities: B-Hum
Two courses (total six units or more) Sciences: B-Sci

6

Additional Breadth

Two courses (total six units or more) outside the student's major subject (may or may not be B-designated courses, and will likely help fulfil individual degree program requirements).

Students choosing to complete a joint major, joint honours, double major, two extended minors, an extended minor and a minor, or two minors may satisfy the breadth requirements (designated or not designated) with courses completed in either one or both program areas.

Residency Requirements and Transfer Credit

  • At least half of the program's total units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.
  • At least two thirds of the program's total upper division units must be earned through Simon Fraser University study.

Students who transfer into the Biological Sciences Major from other institutions may count a maximum of 2 transfer courses toward their upper division program requirements. Transfer students are encouraged to meet with the Undergraduate Advisor for further details.