MENU

BMO Public Lecture with Dr. Nava Ashraf

Economy, Series BMO Public Lectures, 2019

Human Nature & Human Development

Behavioural economics shows us that we do not always act in our own best interest. Our internal biases and cognitive limitations can lead us to make poor choices despite readily available information and resources.

Fortunately, human nature can be accounted for to solve the problems that human nature creates. Through an understanding of the cognitive processes behind our decision making, we can apply the tools of behavioural economics to design better policies and organizations as well as improve social welfare.

On September 5, Canadian economist Nava Ashraf will deliver a free public lecture on this topic, drawing on her research that combines economics and psychology to test insights from behavioural economics in the context of global development in Africa, Latin America, and Southeast Asia.

Integral to this work is Ashraf’s concept of altruistic capital, a way to harness our internal desire to be of service to others.

Presented by BMO Financial Group, the Simon Fraser University Department of Economics and SFU Public Square, this free lecture will start at 7 PM and will include a Q&A period, followed by a reception for all guests.

Thu, 05 Sep 2019

7:00 - 9:00 p.m. (PT)

Segal Graduate School of Business
500 Granville St,
Vancouver, BC

We respectfully acknowledge that this event takes place on the Unceded, Traditional, Ancestral Territories of the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh, səl̓ilw̓ətaʔɬ, and xʷməθkʷəy̓əm First Nations.

Speaker

Dr. Nava Ashraf

Nava Ashraf is a Professor at the Department of Economics at London School of Economics and Political Science. She is also Research Director at the Marshall Institute for Philanthropy and Social Entrepreneurship. She received her Ph.D. in Economics from Harvard University, and she was an assistant and later associate professor at Harvard Business School from 2005 to 2016. Professor Ashraf’s research combines psychology and economics, using both lab and field experiments to test insights from behavioural economics in the context of global development in Africa, Latin America, and Southeast Asia. She has pioneered the concept of altruistic capital, a way of harnessing every individual's intrinsic desire to make a positive social impact. Her recent field experiments on health services delivery and educational investment have been carried out jointly with the Ministries of Health and Education in Zambia, using a model of co-generation of knowledge. Professor Ashraf’s research is published in leading journals including the American Economic Review, the Quarterly Journal of Economics and the Journal of Economic Perspectives. She has been awarded a Queen's Jubilee Medal for service by the Government of Canada, and is the youngest person ever to receive the Order of British Columbia.

Watch

Partners

BMO Public Lectures

  • BMO Public Lecture with Janet Currie

    2020, Health, Economy, Series BMO Public Lectures

    Princeton University professor Janet Currie will deliver a public lecture on the overview of research demonstrating the key role of public programs in supporting longer-term human capital development, and pointing to improvements in child mental health as an especially important mechanism.

    Read More →

  • BMO Public Lecture with Nava Ashraf

    Economy, Series BMO Public Lectures, 2019

    Canadian economist Nava Ashraf draws on her research that combines economics and psychology to test insights from behavioural economics in the context of global development in Africa, Latin America, and Southeast Asia

    Read More →

  • BMO Public Lecture with Nathan Nunn

    Economy, Series BMO Public Lectures, 2017, Arts + Culture

    Nathan Nunn, Harvard Professor and SFU alumnus, will discuss recent findings that show how cross-cultural differences are important for explaining local violence and civil wars, and the treatment of women in society, health, education, and wellbeing.

    Read More →

  • BMO Public Lecture with Vernon L Smith

    2014, Economy, Cities, Series BMO Public Lectures

    The Great Recession and the Depression were the result of a severe housing bubble that was triggered by households spiraling into negative net equity. Home values plummeted against fixed mortgages indebtedness, with banks and other lending institutions being pulled into this spiral. Our path to a recovery might be long. Dr. Smith will identify alternative recovery scenarios but none of them are painless.

    Read More →