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Past Events

Researching for Climate Justice

May 29, 2021

A panel of advocates, researchers, policy-makers and solution-seekers gathered virtually on May 19, 2021 for a critical and compelling conversation about researching for climate justice.

Climate justice is an approach that embeds climate change within social justice and recognizes that the people most negatively impacted by climate change are those least responsible for creating those impacts and those least able to mitigate or adapt to them. Climate justice also requires that climate solutions use the lens of justice and equity. As an example, climate justice requires governments to not aggressively rush towards climate actions without considering the ways those actions may disproportionately impact vulnerable people and groups.

Rueben George, a member of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation, opened the event. George is the manager of Sacred Trust, an initiative of the Tsleil-Waututh Nation mandated to stop the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline and tanker project. Moderator Am Johal, the director of SFU's Vancity Office of Community Engagement and co-director of SFU’s Community-Engaged Research Initiative, then introduced a panel of seven speakers and three respondents who each offered a unique perspective on key questions about climate justice including:

  • What is climate justice?
  • What are the root causes of climate injustice?
  • Why should we strive for climate justice?
  • Whose voices should researchers and students concerned about climate justice listen to and amplify?
  • What are some of the barriers towards embracing climate justice in research and policy?

A key barrier identified during the discussion was the difficulty of developing clear evaluation processes and targets to measure climate justice. This challenge was related to an issue raised by all of the panelists: the need for better data to understand and respond to climate injustices. Specifically, disaggregated demographic data is needed to identify how different groups are experiencing the impacts of the climate crisis.

The conversations from this event will inspire the direction of future events and content as part of Towards Equity, SFU Public Square's 2021 Community Summit series. PICS is proud to be a partner in the Researching for Climate Justice event.

Find out more at SFU Public Square.

PARTNERS

Vancity, Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions (PICS), Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives - BC Office (CCPA-BC), SFU’s Vancity of Community Engagement, SFU Sustainability Office, SFU’s Faculty of Environment and SFU's Public Square.

PANELISTS

  • Anjali Appadurai — Climate Justice Campaigner, Sierra Club BC
  • Andréanne Doyon — Assistant Professor and Director, Resource and Environmental Planning Program, SFU
  • Maya Gislason — Assistant Professor, Faculty of Health Sciences, SFU
  • Eugene Kung — Staff Lawyer, West Coast Environmental Law
  • Marc Lee — Senior Economist, Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (BC Office)
  • Tesicca Truong — Ministerial Advisor, Ministry of Jobs, Economic Recovery and Innovation

RESPONDENTS

  • Bentley Allan — Associate Director, Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions (PICS)
  • Jonathan Fowlie — Chief External Relations Officer, Vancity
  • Mumbi Maina — Social Planner, Social Policy and Projects, City of Vancouver

MODERATOR

Am Johal — Director, SFU's Vancity Office of Community Engagement, and Co-Director, SFU's Community-Engaged Research Initiative

Climate Impacts on the Mental Health and Wellness of British Columbian

Join The BC-CfE's COAST team in an exciting virtual Café Scientifique titled “Climate Impacts on the Mental Health and Wellness of British Columbians” on February 1st, 2021. This event represents a collaboration between the BC-CfE, the University of Victoria, Simon Fraser University and the Pacific Climate Impacts Consortium, and has been funded by the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions.

The event, to be held over Zoom due to pandemic restrictions, hopes to raise awareness and facilitate community engagement on the topic of climate change and mental health and specifically discuss the pathways by which mental health and wellness and climate change influence each other. Through presentations and an interactive Q&A, we will hear from two well respected academics in the field of climate change and mental health, Dr. Ashlee Cunsolo and Dr. Maya Gislason.

This event will begin with an Indigenous Ceremonial Opening by Elder Valerie Nicholson, a peer Indigenous Research Associate at the BC-CfE and will be moderated by youth climate activist, Abhay Sachal, co-founder and director at Break the Divide Foundation.

Recording

Learn more at the Mental Health and Climate Change Alliance website -  a space for our community of practice to connect and share

 

Speakers Bios:

Dr. Cunsolo is the founding dean of the School of Arctic and Subarctic Studies at the Labrador Institute of Memorial University, a former Canada Research Chair (Tier II) and a member of the Royal Society of Canada of New Scholars, Artists and Scientists. She is a leading voice nationally and internationally on climate change, mental health and ecological grief and has written numerous articles as well as contributed regularly to the media on these topics. She is a lead author on the Health Canada Climate Change Assessment reports.

Dr. Gislason is an Assistant Professor in the Faculty of Health Sciences at Simon Fraser University and a Michael Smith Foundation Health Research Scholar. She is a longstanding champion of ecosystem approaches to health, and as a climate change and health equity scholar she focuses primarily on addressing the impacts of climate change and intensive resource extraction on rural, remote, northern and Indigenous communities in Canada. Through her work, she strives to strengthen Planetary Health and advance intergenerational climate justice and believes interventions should be defined by co-benefits to both people and the planet.

Climate Solutions Innovation Series

Join the conversation between SFU researchers, students, and the City of Burnaby as they discuss and design innovative climate change solutions in a COVID-19 reality. The Climate Solutions Innovation Series is hosted by the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions (PICS), and Simon Fraser University (SFU)’s Sustainability Office and Office of Community Engagement.

In each webinar, speakers will engage in 10-minute pitches followed by an opportunity for participants to engage and ask questions.  

In addition, a brief presentation on the new PICS collaborative research program and its current funding opportunity will help frame the discussion on targeting new collaborations in pursuit of high-impact climate solutions.

Don’t miss this opportunity to connect first-hand with some of British Columbia’s climate solutions innovators!

Recording of the series

PROGRAM

WEBINAR 1: Tuesday, June 23, 2020, from 5 pm-6 pm

Building more sustainable and resilient cities: new opportunities for innovative solutions

Speakers

Dr. Zafar Adeel, Executive Director, Pacific Water Research Centre, Professor of Professional Practice, School of Resources and Environmental Management, SFU

Dr. Taco Niet, Assistant Professor of Professional Practice at the School of Sustainable Energy Engineering, SFU

Maya Chorobik, Senior Community Energy Manager, Community Energy Association

WEBINAR 2: Wednesday, June 24, 2020, from 11 am-12 pm

Developing greener transportation systems in light of COVID-19

Speakers

Moreno Zanotto, Cities, Health and Active Transportation Lab, SFU

Zoe Long, Research Manager, Sustainable Transportation Action Research Team, SFU

Renée de St. Croix, Senior Planner, City of Burnaby BC

Register here for each individual session

Climate Literacy 101: On a Path to Climate Success

Are you concerned about climate change? Interested in understanding the climate system and learning effective climate action pathways?

Join EMBARK and PICS at Climate Literacy 101 - a Virtual Lunch & Learn series on May 27, June 3 and June 10 -  to learn from and engage with leading climate science and policy experts at Simon Fraser University (SFU). 

We are grateful to have Dr. Kirsten Zickfeld and Dr. Mark Jaccard presenting on the state of the climate and how citizens can contribute to climate success, as well as participating in a Q&A session over Zoom. The event series will close with information about ongoing campus climate action initiatives and ways to get involved at SFU.

RECORDING OF THE SERIES

PROGRAM

Session 1: The State of the Climate

Wednesday, May 27th, 12 pm -1 pm 

Dr. Kirsten Zickfeld will speak about the climate science that underpins the requirement for net zero carbon dioxide emissions to stabilize Earth’s climate. She will illustrate the atmospheric greenhouse effect, the long permanence of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere and the lag in the warming of the ocean, which conspire to keep global mean temperature elevated even if human-made carbon dioxide emissions are eliminated.

Session 2: From Myths to Effective Climate Action

Wednesday, June 3rd, 12 pm -1 pm

Dr. Mark Jaccard will speak on how climate-concerned citizens can overcome myths that hinder us from acting in time to prevent extreme climate impacts. Their actions can involve personal consumption choices (electric vehicles, heat pumps) but these only have an effect if citizens are also engaged in the political process and civil society to elect and support climate-sincere politicians. These personal and collective efforts must align with and foster a global strategy of decarbonization, especially in developing countries. Come to the talk to find out what is required on a simple path to climate success and what you can contribute.

Session 3: Climate Action at SFU

Wednesday, June 10th, 12 pm - 1 pm

In this session, you will hear about various climate action initiatives at SFU and opportunities to get involved. Participating groups include SFU350, Embark's Climate Action Team, SFU Sustainability Office, and PICS.

Register here for each individual session.

Climate Emergency: A Citizen's Guide to Climate Success

In this talk PICS-sponsored talk, Mark Jaccard shares the findings of his new book and speaks on how climate-concerned citizens can overcome myths that hinder us from acting in time to prevent extreme climate impacts. Their actions can involve personal consumption choices (electric vehicles, heat pumps) but these only have an effect if citizens are also engaged in the political process and civil society to elect and support climate-sincere politicians. These personal and collective efforts must align with and foster a global strategy of decarbonization, especially in developing countries. Come to the talk to find out what you can do.  Matt Horne will respond to Mark's presentation and share strategies that the City of Vancouver is implementing to create climate success.

When: February 11, 2020 7 pm to 9 pm

Where: SFU Harbour Centre, Room 1900, 515 West Hastings, Vancouver, BC

This event is free and open to everyone. Reservations are NOT required. 

We anticipate a full house so recommend arriving early. Mark's book will also be available for purchase.

You can also watch the live webcast. 

Mark Jaccard

Mark Jaccard was recently named an SFU Distinguished Professor. He is an author of the International Panel on Climate Change, and a member of the Royal Society of Canada for his internationally-recognized research using economic models to assess climate policies. He has won the Donner Prize for best policy book in Canada, the BC Academic of the Year Award, and several SFU awards including the Sterling Prize, the President’s Sustainability Award, and the Media and Outreach Award. He has also been arrested for blocking a coal train.

Matt Horne

Matt Horne is the City of Vancouver's Climate Policy Manager. In this role he is responsible for delivering on the City's commitment to have 100% of the energy used in Vancouver come from renewable sources by 2050. Horne also advises senior management and the Mayor on climate change policy issues. Matt Horne is also an SFU alumni, graduating with a Master's in Resource in Environmental Management after attaining a Bachelor of Industrial Engineering degree from Dalhousie University.

Conference: State-City Collaboration on Clean Energy Transformations

Globally, cities are responsible for the majority of the world’s energy consumption and greenhouse gas emissions. To successfully enable the urban energy transition, co-operation is needed between local and senior levels of government.

Join Renewable Cities from May 29–30, 2019 in Vancouver, B.C. to learn how leading jurisdictions are collaboratively advancing clean energy policy.

Where: SFU Morris J. Wosk Centre for Dialogue, 580 West Hastings Street, Vancouver , BC

Conference Streams:

Transportation Electrification
Renewable Natural Gas
Integrated Land-Use, Transportation and Housing

For more information and to register, please visit
renewablecities.ca/conference

This event is sponsored by the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions.

Communication and Advocacy in Science - A workship with Gavin Schmidt

March 22, 2019

In recent years, with the rise of social media, many more scientists are becoming public communicators but sometimes have an incomplete or exaggerated view of the risks to both their public and professional reputations as a function of their advocacy. In politicized fields such as climate science, these communications can attract disproportionate attention. I argue that public statements in such a situation are inevitably advocacy for some position, view, or outcome. However, rather than suggesting that scientists avoid advocacy in a misplaced attempt to remain objective, I recommend that scientists be explicit about the combination of values and science that drives their views, and discusses the ways scientists can ensure that their advocacy remains responsible. The risks of advocacy are fundamentally related to the degree to which values are shared between scientists and their audiences. An encapsulation of the connections between risks, advocacy, and values in engagement may help inform the choices that public scientists must make

The role of complex modelling in climate science

March 21, 2019

When climate models first emerged some 40 years ago, it was unclear whether anything useful could be obtained from the necessarily crude representations of climate processes contained within them. But in the subsequent four decades, the early successes in prediction and understanding have been replicated many times, and climate models have emerged as a dominant tool in discussing past, present and future climate change. I will discuss the history of climate modelling, the ‘philosophy’ of model development and the new challenges posed by the onset of ‘big data’.

Link to the recording

Speaker Bio

Gavin Schmidt is the Director of the NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies and works on the simulation of climate in the past, present and possible futures. He was the author with Joshua Wolfe of “Climate Change: Picturing the Science “in 2009, and in 2011 was the inaugural recipient of the AGU Climate Communications Prize. He is a fellow of the AGU and AAAS. His 2014 TED Talk (in Vancouver) has been viewed over a million times.

This event is co-hosted by: SFU Department of Geography and the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions

The Psychology of change: Achieving a transformation of the Global Food System

March 5, 2019

An urgent health and environmental challenge is how to provide nearly 10 billion people with healthy and sustainable diets by 2050. Currently, the types of food we eat, the ways we produce it, and the amounts wasted or lost threatens human health and environmental sustainability while also contributing to climate change. Psychology can help intervene in the human behaviours that contribute to unsustainable methods and promote the changes required to transform the global food system. During this colloquium, a group of experts will discuss findings from the recently published EAT-Lancet report on Healthy Diets from Sustainable Food Systems and the newly revamped Canadian Food Guide to explore how this knowledge can be used to create a food system transformation locally and globally.

Link to the recording

Keynote Speech: Delivering Healthy & Sustainable Diets to all Canadians

Brent Loken, Director of Science Translation, EAT
Courtney Howard, CAPE-Canadian Associations of Physicians for the Environment

Moderator: 

Evan Fraser, Director of Arrell Food Institute, Univ. of Guelph will moderate the panel discussion

Panelists:

Susan Clayton, Whitmore-Williams Professor of Psychology-Wooster
Tammara Soma, Assistant Professor (Planning), School of Resource and Environmental Management-SFU
Hannah Wittman, Professor, Academic Director, Centre for Sustainable Food Systems at UBC Farm
Ned Bell, Executive Chef, Ocean Wise, Chefs for Oceans
Clifford Atleo, Kam’ayaam/Chachim’multhnii, Assistant Professor, School of Resource and Environmental Management-SFU

Impacts and Risks of 1.5 adn 2 degrees

February 28, 2019

This talk focused on the approach used by the scientific community to assess literature relevant to the question of what is dangerous anthropogenic interference with the climate system: the IPCC's so-called “reasons for concern”, including what they are, how they evolved, and what the IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5 degrees says, particularly for the selected human and natural systems.  The presentation explored the benefits of keeping global warming below 1.5 degrees compared with 2 degrees. 

Last talk of the Climate Futures Series: The SCIENCE, IMPACTS and SOLUTIONS to limit global temperature increase to 1.5 degrees hosted by the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions, Climate Futures Initiative and SFU’s Faculty of Environment.

Presenter: Kristie Ebi, Director of the Center for Health and the Global Environment, University of Washington, USA

Respondent: Stewart J. Cohen, Environment and Climate Change Canada

Moderator: Tim Takaro, Professor, Faculty of Health Sciences, Simon Fraser University

Link to the recording

Speaker Bios

Kristie Ebi

Kristie Ebi is director of the Center for Health and the Global Environment (CHanGE), and Rohm and Haas Endowed Professor in Public Health Sciences at the University of Washington. She has been conducting research and practice on the health risks of climate variability and change for over twenty years, focusing on understanding sources of vulnerability, estimating current and future health risks of climate change, and designing adaptation policies and measures to reduce the risks of climate change in multi-stressor environments. She has been an author on multiple national and international climate change assessments, including the IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C.

Stewart J. Cohen

Dr. Stewart J. Cohen is Senior Researcher with the Climate Research Division of Environment and Climate Change Canada. He has contributed to more than 125 publications on climate change impacts and adaptation, including a textbook, “Climate Change in the 21st Century”, published by McGill-Queens University Press. Dr. Cohen has been a member of author teams for national assessments of climate change in Canada and the United States, as well as several publications of the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC).

Solutions for 1.5 Degrees | Which path to halting climate change?

January 10, 2019

To halt global warming, global carbon dioxide emissions have to be reduced to net zero. This, however, is no easy task. Many of our daily activities currently produce greenhouse gas emissions that are then released into the atmosphere, and changes in one area can affect emissions elsewhere. To capture these complex interactions and understand how these greenhouse gas emissions can be avoided, researchers use integrated models that describe our global economy, how we produce energy and the ways in which we use our land for food. The options and choices available to society to transform towards a more sustainable future are then explored through scenarios – “what-if” stories that project how the future could look like under a given set of assumptions. In this talk, we will explore together how the limited amount of carbon dioxide that we can still emit while limiting global warming to safe levels can be translated into emissions pathways that inform the climate change debate and climate policy about choices that are made today.

Presenter: Joeri Rogelj, Lecturer, Grantham Institute at Imperial College London

Respondent: Mark Jaccard, Professor, SFU

Moderator: Kirsten Zickfeld, Associate Professor, SFU

Link to the recording 

Speaker Bios

Joeri Rogelj

Dr Joeri Rogelj is Lecturer in Climate Change and the Environment at the Grantham Institute at Imperial College London, and Senior Research Scholar at the International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA). His research aims at actively informing the international climate policy debate through dedicated interdisciplinary research and analysis, and focusses on the scientific assessment of international climate agreements, the identification and response to major gaps in knowledge for effective climate policy, and the development of new concepts bridging the divide between social and physical sciences. Over the past decade, Joeri Rogelj has led several major scientific climate change assessments, including the Emissions Gap Reports by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP). He served as a Coordinating Lead Author on the IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5°C, and is currrently a Lead Author on the IPCC’s Sixth Assessment Report.

Mark Jaccard 

Mark Jaccard is a professor in the School of Resource and Environmental Management at Simon Fraser University. He teaches interdisciplinary courses in energy and materials sustainability, covering basic physics, technologies, economics, policy and human cognition and behaviour. He has contributed to several major processes and assessments, including the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change British Columbia’s Climate Action Team. He was named a Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 2009 and British Columbia’s Academic of the Year in 2008.

 

Is it possible to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees?

November 21, 2018

The Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions, Climate Futures Initiative and SFU’s Faculty of Environment have co-hosted the first talk of the Climate Futures Series: The SCIENCE, IMPACTS and SOLUTIONS to limit global temperature increase to 1.5 degrees.

This talk highlighted the physical climate science findings of the recently published IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5 degrees, focusing on whether it is feasible from a geophysical perspective to limit global warming to 1.5 degrees.

Link to the recording

Speaker Bio: Nathan Gillett holds a PhD in atmospheric physics from the University of Oxford. After his doctorate, Nathan worked as a postdoc at the University of Victoria on the detection and attribution of climate change, before being appointed as a lecturer then reader at the Climatic Research Unit of the University of East Anglia in the UK. In 2008, Nathan returned to Canada to work as a research scientist at the Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis (CCCma), where he subsequently served as manager from 2014 to 2018. His primary research interests are in detection and attribution of climate change, and the influence of stratospheric ozone depletion on climate. He served as a Lead Author of the IPCC Fourth and Fifth Assessment Reports and of the 2014 WMO/UNEP Ozone Assessment, and is a Convening Lead Author of the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report. He is an adjunct professor at Simon Fraser University and a member of the executive committee of PICS.

Are recent extreme fire seasons in BC attributable to human-induced climate change?

November 21, 2018

In 2018, a record 1.3 million hectares burned in British Columbia's extreme wild fire season. This surpassed the previous year’s record of 1.2 million hectares that blazed across the province. Both fire seasons had major impacts on air quality, forest management and infrastructure across BC.

The Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions (PICS), Climate Futures Initiative and SFU's Faculty of Environment hosted a research seminar to discuss how modelling results by experts from Environment and Climate Change Canada (ECCC) link to anthropogenic climate change. The results also confirm previous projections that such extreme fire seasons will become more frequent in the future with implications for forest management and climate change adaptation.

Link to the recording

SPEAKER BIO:

Nathan Gillett holds a PhD in atmospheric physics from the University of Oxford. After his doctorate, Nathan worked as a post-doc at the University of Victoria on the detection and attribution of climate change, before being appointed as a lecturer then reader at the Climatic Research Unit of the University of East Anglia in the UK. In 2008, Nathan returned to Canada to work as a research scientist at the Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis (CCCma), where he subsequently served as manager from 2014 to 2018. His primary research interests are in detection and attribution of climate change, and the influence of stratospheric ozone depletion on climate. He served as a Lead Author of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) Fourth and Fifth Assessment Reports and of the 2014 WMO/UNEP Ozone Assessment, and is a Convening Lead Author of the IPCC Sixth Assessment Report. He is a member of the PICS executive committee and an adjunct professor at Simon Fraser University.

Limiting Global Warming to 1.5 degrees: What does it take & is it worth it?

October 17, 2018

Under the Paris Agreement 195 nations set a goal to limit an increase in the world's average temperature to "well below" 2 degrees Celsius, while pursuing efforts to limit warming to 1.5 degrees. They invited the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) to assess the impacts of greenhouse gas emission pathways consistent with a global warming of 1.5 degrees. The report was released in early October.

Kirsten Zickfeld, a lead author of the IPCC Special Report on Global Warming of 1.5 degrees, will share the key findings and describe the current warming relative to 1.5 degrees, the actions needed to achieve the 1.5 degree limit, and the benefits of limiting warming to 1.5 degrees compared to higher limits.

Presenter: Kirsten Zickfeld, Professor of Geography, SFU

Respondent: Simon Donner, Professor of Geography, UBC

Moderator: Tim Takaro, Associate Dean, Research and Professor, Health Sciences, SFU

 

This event is hosted by PICS, SFU's Climate Futures Initiative and Faculty of Environment.

Building Climate Solutions: partnerships for new ideas, new approaches, new entrants

September 7, 2018

The Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions (PICS) recently announced a call for proposals under its new Opportunity Projects Program.  The Opportunity program is a catalyst for developing climate solutions and will support an approach to research that defines meaningful activities focused on partnerships and engagement, helping climate solution seekers become effective solution makers, from question to collaboration, and idea to action. Proposals are invited for high-quality, innovative research projects in areas of high potential for impact in climate change mitigation and adaptation including emerging and novel issues.

Quick facts:

 

- Each award is capped at $60,000 per year for a total program allocation of up to $600,000 annually.
- Projects must involve solutions seekers (e.g. industry, local governments, indigenous communities) and research partners.
- There is no restriction on the number or location of researchers, but proposals should be relevant to BC and include participation of BC researchers. At least half of project costs must be allocated to salaries of graduate students and postdocs at one of PICS’ research universities.
- Project duration shall not exceed three years.

The deadline to submit proposals is October 15, 2018

Link to the recording

 

Renewable natural gas – Unlocking local government potential in B.C.

June 15, 2018

Natural gas is the source of one-quarter of British Columbia’s greenhouse gas emissions. But there is another way to generate this energy that could provide substantial emissions reductions: renewable natural gas (RNG), derived from diverse organic waste sources.

Local governments are well-placed to enable RNG development as they control key organic and liquid waste feedstocks and may be also be positioned to aggregate forest and farm feedstocks. Local governments are often working to meet climate and waste diversion targets and have been making substantial infrastructure investments in pursuit of those goals; RNG generation could provide a cost effective and strategic alternative. If local governments can harness waste feedstocks to produce clean, renewable energy, they will be able to promote new economic opportunities while reducing carbon emissions.

Join Renewable Cities for the launch of a new collaborative research project to explore how to advance the local government opportunity for RNG development in B.C. Hear from key players who will help develop solutions to unlock local government RNG development and share your insights.

Renewable Cities events are archived on YouTube.

SPEAKERS

  • Jennifer Davison, Senior Policy Analyst, Electricity and Alternative Energy Division, Ministry of Energy Mines and Petroleum Resources, Government of BC
  • Ela Lukowska, Biofuel Project Manager, City of Surrey
  • Dana Wong, Public Policy Manager, FortisBC

Opening remarks: Gunn Kim, Consul General of the Republic of Korea in Vancouver
Moderator: Alex Boston, Executive Director, Renewable Cities

Event in partnership with the Consulate General of the Republic of Korea and the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions

The Future of Fishes and Fisheries in the Changing Ocean

May 3, 2018

This presentation will explain the risk of climate change on coupled marine human and natural systems and explore possible solutions to reduce such risk. Specifically, it examines some of the key responses of marine fish stocks and fisheries to climate change and their implications for human society. It highlights the importance of mitigating carbon emission and achieving the Paris Agreement in reducing climate risk on marine fish stocks and fisheries. Finally, it discusses potential opportunities for helping fisheries to reduce climate threats, through adaptation.

Link to the recording

William Cheung

Dr. William Cheung is an Associate Professor at the Institute for the Oceans and Fisheries, UBC and the Director (Science) of the Nippon Foundation-UBC Nereus Program. His main research areas include understanding the responses and vulnerabilities of marine ecosystems and fisheries to global change, and examining trade-offs in managing and conserving living marine resources. His works cut across multiple disciplines, from oceanography to ecology, economics and social sciences, and range from local to global scales.

William has published over 150 peer-reviewed publications, including papers in leading international journals. William is also actively involved in international and regional initiatives that bridge science and policy. For instance, he was a Lead Author in the Working Group II of the Fifth Assessment Report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), a Coordinating Lead Author of the Intergovernmental Platform on Biodiversity and Ecosystem Services (IPBES) and Global Biodiversity Outlook. He serves as member of the editorial board of Fish and Fisheries, Fisheries Oceanography and Frontier in Marine Sciences, and as scientific advisors in a number of international and local organizations including BioDiscovery, IUCN and WWF Canada.

William obtained his BSc in Biology and M.Phil. from the University of Hong Kong. He worked for WWF Hong Kong for two years, after which he completed his PhD in Resource Management and Environmental Studies at UBC. From 2009 to 2011, he was Lecturer in Marine Ecosystem Services in the School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia.

Brought to you by: Climate Futures Initiative and the Pacific Insititute for Climate Solutions

 

Health Impacts of Heat: Adapting to a Changing Climate

 

April 18th, 2018 

While exposure to high ambient temperature (i.e., heat) is widely recognized as a threat to public health, the burden of illness and death attributable to heat in the US remains high. Our research in this area highlights that in the US: 1) the burden of present-day heat-related and mortality remains high, 2) heat and other climatic hazards tend to co-occur with each other as well as with indicators of social vulnerability, 3) adhering to a lower greenhouse gas emissions scenario has the potential to avert a quantifiable and substantial number of heat-related deaths compared to the business as usual emissions scenario, and 4) current approaches to protecting the public during heat events have uncertain – and perhaps limited – impact. Our group seeks to provide evidence to national and local officials for minimizing the adverse health impacts of present-day and projected future heat.

Link to the recording   

Gregory Wellenius, Associate Professor of Epidemiology and Director of the Center for Environmental Health and Technology at Brown University.  He is broadly interested in studying environmental determinants of cardiovascular disease. His work has primarily focused on studying the effects of ambient air pollution on the risk of cardiovascular events and its effects on cardiovascular physiology. In the context of these studies, he uses tools from the fields of epidemiology and toxicology to: 1) evaluate the association between environmental exposures and disease, 2) identify subgroups of the population that may be particularly susceptible, and 3) elucidate the physiologic mechanisms for the observed effects.

Brought to you by: Climate Futures Initiative and the Pacific Insititute for Climate Solutions

Investing Powerfully: How can universities go carbon neutral?

 

 

How can universities move toward carbon neutral and socially responsible investments?

April 5, 2018

Investing Powerfully creates space for students, financial professionals, and university representatives to explore best investment practices for climate accountability. Through a speakers' panel and facilitated Q&A, attendees will discover the connections between decarbonization, divestment and responsible investments, and envision how reinvestment can strengthen communities.

Panelists: 

  • Mike Thiessen, Manager of Sustainable Research, Genus Capital
  • Peter Chapman, Executive Director, Shareholder Association for Research and Education
  • (SHARE)
  • Danielle Levine, CEO, Kanuu Indigenous Innovation Society 

Link to the recording

This event is presented by Embark Sustainability with support from the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions.

Acknowledgments
Embark acknowledges that this event is being hosted on the unceded territory of the Coast Salish Peoples. In particular, this includes the land of the Tsleil-Waututh, Musqueam, Skwxwú7mesh, and Kwikwetlem nations where we work, live, and play.

Accessibility
This event is hosted in a theatre presentation room with escalating stairs. Please contact Gianjeet Kaur at programs@embarksustainability.org to make us aware of any specific accessibility needs.

British Columbia's climate plan and the urban opportunity

A conversation with the Minister of Environment and Climate Change Strategy


February 9, 2017 

When British Columbia laid out its first climate plan a decade ago, it set a precedent, embracing local governments to drive greenhouse gas reductions. As North America’s first jurisdiction to require community-level emissions targets, B.C. influenced other climate leaders, such as California, Ontario, and Oregon.

Today, ten years later, greenhouse gas emissions in the B.C. are virtually unchanged. The province and most local governments are not on track to meet their targets.

With the Government of B.C. updating its climate plan, how will the urban agenda be considered?

Join us for a presentation and conversation with George Heyman, Minister of Environment and Climate Change Strategy for British Columbia.

At the dialogue we will:

· Learn about the government’s strategy for updating B.C.’s climate plan

· Discuss opportunities for integrating urban priorities into the climate plan

Link to the recording

This event is hosted by Renewable Cities with support from The Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions.

Resilient Cities: An Integrated Economic Approach to Natural Hazard Risk Mitigation

 

Date: February 1, 2018 - 12:30pm to 5:00pm

Location: 4400 Policy Room, SFU Segal Building, 500 Granville StreetVancouver , BC

The British Consulate-General of Vancouver together with the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions invite you to attend a public seminar on "Resilient Cities: An Integrated Economic Approach to Natural Hazard Risk Mitigation". Learn what innovation and finance options from the UK can do for your jurisdiction’s resiliency plans.

Please join us to explore current thinking and innovative solutions for the City of Vancouver on:

  • Quantifying Risk: Measuring, Modeling and Evaluation
  • Financial Mitigation: Pricing Vulnerability, Transferring Risk and Innovative Financial Models
  • Capital Markets: Leveraging Private Finance to Increase Resilience
  • Resilient Infrastructure: Finance, Design and Build

This seminar will connect UK experts with local officials, academics, and members of the Vancouver community to exchange best practices and ideas on resiliency. Participants will discuss natural catastrophe related challenges facing Vancouver such as sea level rise and increased storm severity. They will address a wide-range of topics including quantifying and reducing risk, reinsurance, the insurance linked securities market, resilience and catastrophe bonds, investor interest in assuming disaster risk, and resilient infrastructure. The seminar will also consider the unique social and economic resiliency challenges facing Vancouver in the coming years.

This is a free event, please RSVP to save your seat.   Refreshments will be serverd at 12:30 pm.

Moderated by: British Consul General Vancouver, Nicole Davison.

Octopus's Garden: Planning for Sea Level Rise Series

 

November 8, 2017

Sea Level Rise - The Big Picture

Featuring John Englander, Oceanographer, Consultant and Leading Expert on Sea Level Rise, Florida, USA and Gil Kelley, Chief Planner and General Manager of Planning, Urban Design and Sustainability, City of Vancouver and and Dr. Sybil Seitzinger, Executive director of the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions.

Information

Link to the recording

Bios:

John Englander is an oceanographer, consultant and leading expert on sea level rise. His broad marine science background coupled with explorations to Greenland and Antarctica allow him to see the big picture of sea level rise and its societal impacts. He brings the diverse points of view of an industry scientist, entrepreneur and CEO. For over 30 years, he has been a leader in both the private and non-profit sectors, serving as Chief Executive Officer for the International SeaKeepers and the Coutsteau Society. As founder of Englander and Associates John works with businesses, government agencies and communities to understand the financial risks of increased flooding due to the compounding effects of rising seas, extreme tides, unprecedented rainfall and storm surge, advocating for “intelligent adaptation”. He believes that along with the tremendous risks in the coming decades there will also be enormous economic opportunities that will allow us to thrive if we begin to plan and adapt now.

Gil Kelley is the General Manager of Planning, Urban Design and Sustainability, with the City of Vancouver.
He leads the City’s work on all city planning visioning, policy, urban design, and major development negotiations. He is also responsible for the effective implementation of the Greenest City Action Plan, Renewable City Strategy, and green building initiatives. He is a voting member of the Development Permit Board and a member of the Corporate Management Team. Before joining the City of Vancouver in 2016, Gil was the director of citywide planning for the City of Francisco and also spent ten years as the director of planning for the City of Portland. An alumnus of the prestigious Loeb Fellowship program at Harvard University Graduate School of Design, Gil holds a BA in political economy and is a graduate candidate for a Master of Science degree from MIT.

Sybil Seitzinger is the Executive Director of the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions (PICS), and Professor in the School of Environmental Studies at the University of Victoria. Dr. Seitzinger joins PICS from her position as executive director of the International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme (IGBP) based in Stockholm, Sweden. Prior to that, she was director of the Rutgers/NOAA Cooperative Marine Education and Research Program and visiting professor at Rutgers University in the US. She served as president of the American Society of Limnology and Oceanography from 2006-2010. Dr. Seitzinger’s work at the IGBP involved facilitating and integrating the work of scientists and researchers across Africa, the Americas, Asia-Pacific and Europe on global environmental change. As a pioneering scientist, her work at Rutgers centred on land-atmosphere-ocean biogeochemistry, with a focus on changes in the global nitrogen cycle and how humans are affecting it. Dr. Seitzinger holds a PhD in biological oceanography from the University of Rhode Island, is an elected member of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, and has been awarded an honorary PhD from Utrecht University in the Netherlands.

Brought to you by the Adaptation to Climate Change Team (ACT), and the Pacific Water Research Centre in the Faculty of Environment at Simon Fraser University, the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions, the City of Vancouver, Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation, and  the Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre.

 

Lunch Seminar with John Englander

Join us for this seminar on "Planning for Sea Level Rise" with John Englander, Oceanographer, Consultant and Leading Expert on Sea Level Rise. He will be visiting SFU Burnaby Campus to engage with researchers and students working on diverse topics on climate change science and climate solutions. 

When: November 8, 2017, 12:30 to 1:30 pm 
Where: SFU Burnaby Campus, Room ASB 10908, 8888 University Drive 

Reservations: This event is open to all the SFU Community. Please register as space is limited.  Click here to register
Light lunch will be served prior the start of the event. 

Brought to you by the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions at SFU, the Climate Future Initiatives and the Pacific Water Research Centre. 


Biography: 

John Englander is an oceanographer, consultant and leading expert on sea level rise. His broad marine science background coupled with explorations to Greenland and Antarctica allow him to see the big picture of sea level rise and its societal impacts. He brings the diverse points of view of an industry scientist, entrepreneur and CEO. For over 30 years, he has been a leader in both the private and non-profit sectors, serving as Chief Executive Officer for the International SeaKeepers and the Coutsteau Society. As founder of Englander and Associates John works with businesses, government agencies and communities to understand the financial risks of increased flooding due to the compounding effects of rising seas, extreme tides, unprecedented rainfall and storm surge, advocating for “intelligent adaptation”. He believes that along with the tremendous risks in the coming decades there will also be enormous economic opportunities that will allow us to thrive if we begin to plan and adapt now. 

Octopus's Garden: Planning for Sea Level Rise Series

Who will be tending your vegetable garden when the ocean rises? An octopus? A seastar? The Octopus's Garden series features experts on sea level rise from a wide variety of backgrounds who will address ways we can adapt and build resilience, with a focus on local to global challenges and solutions.

Fourth talk of the series

October 19, 2017

Sea Level Rise and Forced Migration - The Challenges for Climate Refugees
Room 1900, Harbour Centre, Simon Fraser University, 515 West Hastings, Vancouver

Featuring Dr. Saleemul Huq, Director, Centre for Climate Change and Development, London, U.K. (via video conference); James Horncastle, Lecturer, Hellenic Studies, Simon Fraser University and Anna Zhuo, Co-founder, Climate Migrants and Refugees Project, Vancouver.

Link to the recording

Bios:

Saleemul Huq joined the International Centre for Climate Change and Development in 2009 as the Director and is also a Senior Fellow at the International Institute for Environment and Development. He is an expert on the links between climate change and sustainable development, particularly from the perspective of developing countries. He was the lead author of the chapter on Adaptation and Sustainable Development in the third assessment report of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, and also for the chapter on Adaptation and Mitigation in its fourth assessment report. His research currently focuses on the least developed countries’ vulnerability to climate change and the impact of adaptation measures.

James Horncastle is a lecturer in the Hellenic Studies program at Simon Fraser University. A specialist in the history of the Balkans, Dr. Horncastle’s research focuses on how conflict and refugee movements helped give rise to the contemporary national and state identities in the region during the Twentieth Century, on which he has published extensively. Currently, Dr. Horncastle is pursuing research on the role of population movements and security in Southeast Europe. The contemporary refugee crisis has brought into sharp relief the security issues brought on by population movements, but this is not a new phenomenon. Dr. Horncastle’s current project helps show how climate variances have played a crucial role in the past in facilitating both population movements and conflict in the twentieth century, and how states and peoples responded to these developments in the past can help inform future responses.

Anna Zhuo is a co-founder of the Climate Migrants and Refugees Project, a non-profit organization working to increase capacity for urban resilience and planning in the face of climate change and global migration. She is from Vancouver and has a Master's in Community and Regional Planning from UBC SCARP. Her experience as part of an immigrant family and involvement with the temporary resettlement of a refugee family drives her interest in advancing settlement and integration planning in Canada and she recently attended the Habitat III conference in Quito as part of the Canadian delegation. Anna’s multidisciplinary interests stem from her academic background in life science and psychology, in addition to work experiences in health geography research, campus planning and sustainability, and urban development research on implementation challenges.

Brought to you by the Adaptation to Climate Change Team (ACT), and the Pacific Water Research Centre in the Faculty of Environment at Simon Fraser University, the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions, the City of Vancouver, Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation, and  the Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre.

Octopus's Garden: Planning for Sea Level Rise Series

Third talk of the series 

October 5, 2017 

Sea Level Rise and the International Response - Policy Action

Featuring Special Envoy on Water for the Kingdom of the Netherlands Henk Ovink and Flood Consultant Tamsin Lyle (Ebbwater Consulting) and Lawyer, Deborah Carlson (West Coast Environmental Law) who will explore policy options from international to local levels followed by discussion.

Link to the recording

Brought to you by the Adaptation to Climate Change Team (ACT), and the Pacific Water Research Centre in the Faculty of Environment at Simon Fraser University, the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions, the City of Vancouver, Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation, and  the Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre.

The Octopus's Garden: Planning for Sea level Rise Series

 

September 21, 2017 - 7pm
Sea Level Rise in Deep History - First Nations Coastal Flood Stories
Asia Pacific Hall, Wosk Centre for Dialogue, Simon Fraser University, 580 West Hastings, Vancouver

Squamish Chief Ian Campbell and Haida elder Captain Gold shared stories from their nation’s history followed by discussion. Click here to read their bio-sketches.

Link to the recording

Brought to you by the Adaptation to Climate Change Team (ACT), and the Pacific Water Research Centre in the Faculty of Environment at Simon Fraser University, the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions, the City of Vancouver, Vancouver Board of Parks and Recreation, and  the Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre.

Taking Action on Green Resilience: Adaptation & Mitigation Strategies

Workshop

The 2017 Livable Cities Forum will take place September 18-20 in Victoria, BC. As a special pre-event workshop, Green Resilience Strategies and ACT are offering:

Taking Action on Green Resilience: Adaptation & Mitigation Strategies
Sunday, September 17
1:30 – 5:30 pm
Cost: $45 + tax and fees

Registration link

It is time to align our efforts on climate change mitigation and adaptation planning, to increase the returns on investment in climate change and infrastructure and attract more funding for implementation. Join us to explore “Green Resilience” measures that yield both climate change mitigation and adaptation benefits, and discover how they can be financed and implemented across Canada.

Green Resilience Strategies and ACT (Adaptation to Climate Change Team) at Simon Fraser University have documented examples of synergistic Green Resilience measures in a variety of sectors, including energy, transportation, water and flood management. Participants will learn about green resilience opportunities such as microgrids + efficiency + renewables, green infrastructure, flood-proofing mass transit, building efficiency, and water conservation. Breakout discussions will focus on research, analysis, and policy needs to advance the state of practice and accelerate the financing and implementation of green resilience solutions. Light refreshments will be served.

The Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions (PICS) is a sponsor of the Livable Cities Forum and pre-event workshop

9th World Environmental Education Congress 2017

September 9 - 15, 2017

The World Environmental Education Congress (WEEC) is an international congress addressing education for environment and sustainability. WEEC 2017 is the 9th congress and will feature the theme of Culture/Environment: Weaving New Connections.

The congress is an international meeting point for everyone working with education for environment and sustainable future or who has an interest in the field. WEEC 2017 will be an excellent opportunity to learn more about the latest in environmental and sustainability education, to discuss with people from all over the world, to share your own work and to learn from others. We expect participants from a wide range of countries, and so invite you to add your ideas and energy to the mix. From the congress we aim to build a relevant network among environmental NGO’s, civil society associations, universities, local authorities as well as institutions from any level. WEEC congresses have received UNESCO and UNEP patronage and in many cases the presence or a message of the General Secretaries.

Full details and registration. 

The event is hosted by SFU and the Institute for Environmental Learning with support from the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions (PICS).

 

PICS session at the WEEC 2017 Congress on "Innovative tools for education & engagement on Sustainability, Energy and Climate Change"

September 10th, 13:00 to 14:30

This session will explore different interactive games to promote learning on energy, sustainable living and climate change. Each with the goal of mobilizing students to value sustainable actions and to motivate solutions on climate change: 

Megawatts and Marbles: A playful approach to understanding power-systems, Benjamin Lyseng, Institute for Integrated Energy Systems 

Participants take on the roles of power plants and work together to “generate” the required amount of electricity, represented by marbles 

Participants have the opportunity to design and operate their own low-carbon power system 

Experiential learning outcomes include the delicate generation-demand balance and behaviour of different power plants, from coal to solar 

Learning about sustainable living through interactive games, Lyn Bartram, SIAT-SFU 

Two interactive games, the Energy Tree and the Water garden, in which the players can explore the impacts of daily activities on electricity and water use 

Future Delta 2.0. An educational video-game for social mobilization on climate change, Stephen Sheppard, Deepti Mathew Iype and Alicia La Valle, CALP-UBC 

The Future Delta 2.0 (FD2) videogame enables real-time exploration, querying and creative problem solving of local climate change scenarios, allowing users to learn about potential impacts, adaptation solutions, and mitigation strategies to reduce carbon emissions. The purpose of FD2 is to enable the player (beyond high school students & teachers who have helped co-design & evaluate the game) to experience the choices and decisions that are involved in making Delta an attractive and resilient low-carbon community. This immersive and interactive tool provides an active learning environment that can be integrated into high school curricula, as well as accessed by anyone in the broader community. Guided by teachers and supplementary resources, students can help create alternative future scenarios through inquiry learning around real local issues of climate change. It offers teachers a powerful new tool that may add value to their existing methods and help them meet the new BC curriculum and student citizenship goals more efficiently and interactively.

 

The Octopus's Garden

Sea Level Rise Series

Who will be tending your vegetable garden when the ocean rises? An octopus? A seastar? The Octopus's Garden series features experts on sea level rise from a wide variety of backgrounds who will address ways we can adapt and build resilience, with a focus on local to global challenges and solutions.

The series was launched on "Oceans Day" June 8th, 2017

Link to the recording of first talk 

Abstract of first talk:

Imagine the City of Vancouver without the sea wall. Angela Danyluk, Sustainability Specialist with the City of Vancouver, will share emerging ideas as the City begins to plan for a meter of sea level rise by 2100.

The coast of British Columbia may be significantly affected over the next 50 years by sea level rise, increased storms, and erosion - what are coastal communities doing to ensure they are resilient? John Readshaw is the lead author for the updated provincial government guidelines related to adaptation for sea level rise. He will explore the science and physical challenges to adapting to sea level rise, what to expect, and what some communities are doing in preparation.

Much of Vancouver is already built to the edge of the foreshore, so how can we adapt? SFU City Program Manager and former senior urban planner with Bing Thom Architects Andy Yan has mapped the effects of sea level rise and more intense storms and will discuss planning approaches and options we might consider.

Hosted by the Adaptation to Climate Change Team (ACT), and the Pacific Water Research Centre in the Faculty of Environment at Simon Fraser University, the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions, the City of Vancouver, and the Vancouver Aquarium Marine Science Centre

 

 

Renewable Cities: Global Learning Forum 2017

 

Date: May 17, 2017 - 10:00am to May 19, 2017 - 2:00pm

Location: Four Seasons Hotel, 791 West Georgia Street, Vancouver , BC

 

Join Renewable Cities at their 2017 Forum to participate in a solutions-focused dialogue on the transition 100% renewable energy in cities. 400+ leaders from local governments, the private sector, utilities, and the NGO and research communities will gather to engage and learn in Vancouver, British Columbia.

From electricity to heating/cooling to transportation: From policy to building political will, from finance to technology, learn about cross-cutting solutions.

A unique experience: Engage in small group workshops and inspiring plenary sessions with participants from 70 cities from around the world.

Ambitious goals and practical ideas in Vancouver: Meet and learn from international policy and technology innovators in a city that’s committed to 100% renewable energy.
Join Us. Global Learning Forum 2017 will deliver connections, ideas, and inspiration for your work. It features plenary sessions, 32 facilitated and small group workshops, networking receptions, site visits, and more. Experience dialogue difference—join us in Vancouver to engage in our participatory format.

Visit Renewable Cities for full details and registration. 

 

SFU Climate and Energy Research Day: Exploring climate, water and energy nexus

The biennial SFU Climate and Energy Research Day will take place on April 27, 2017 at the SFU Burnaby Campus.  The event is hosted by the SFU’s Office of the Vice-President, Research and International, Faculties of Arts and Social Science, Environment, Health Sciences, Interactive Arts and Technology, and Science, Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions, SFU Climate Futures Initiative, Climate Change Impacts Consortium and the Pacific Water Research Centre.

The 2017 Research Day is focused on the climate, water and energy nexus.  Our goal is to find new research synergies across the university by challenging current research teams in these three areas to work across their disciplinary boundaries and envision projects that span at least two points of this nexus.

The day will comprise:    

  • Opening remarks, Joy Johnson, VP Research and International
  • Keynote speakers: Jonathan Wilkinson, Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of the Environment and Climate Change; Andrea Reimer, City of Vancouver and Stephanie Smith, BC Hydro. 
  • Panel session with Stephanie Smith (BC Hydro), Andrea Reimer (City of Vancouver), Diana Allen ( Earth Sciences), Anil Hira (Political Science), and Jonn Axsen (School of Resource & Environmental Management). Moderator: Zafar Adeel (Pacific Water Research Centre)
  • Poster and research sessions to compete for $1,000 dollars (best reconstructed poster) and $ 5,000 dollars (best research proposal).
  • Plenary and reception

Deadline to register April 24th, 2017  https://sfu-climate-and-energy-2017.eventbrite.com

Program

Sponsors: VP Research and International Office, Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions, Faculty of Environment, Faculty of Science, Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences.

Cumulative carbon emissions budgets consistent with 1.5 °C global warming

 

 

Join us for this research seminar with Nathan Gillett, co-hosted by the Climate Research Lab, Simon Fraser University and the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions.

When: 2:00 to 3:00 pm, Thursday April 13th

Where: Room RCB 7100, Robert Brown Hall, SFU Burnaby Campus

Please join us for this free research seminar with Nathan Gillet, co-hosted by the Climate Research Lab - Department of Geography, Simon Fraser University and the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions.

The Paris Agreement commits ratifying parties to pursuing efforts to limit the global temperature increase to 1.5 °C. Carbon budgets consistent with remaining below 1.5 °C global warming reported in the Working Group I contribution to the Fifth Assessment Report of the IPCC are directly based on responses from CMIP5 earth system models, which, on average, tend to warm more than observations in response to historical CO2 emissions and other forcings. Following the IPCC approach and calculating budgets relatively to 1861-1880, and then subtracting emissions to date yields a median remaining 1.5 °C carbon budget in 2015 of 55 PgC, which can be compared with annual emissions of 10.6 PgC yr-1 in the same year. However, calculating carbon budgets and temperature changes relative to the last decade (2006-2015) eliminates uncertainties related to model spread and model-observation differences over the historical period, and increases the median remaining 1.5 °C carbon budget, to 198 PgC. While it might be thought that uncertainties in projected budgets could be further constrained by choosing a subset of models with historical warming most consistent with observations, we demonstrate that subsetting CMIP5 models in this way does not substantially change calculated CO2 emissions budgets. We further explore the substantial influence of non-CO2 forcings including land use change on this budget in earth system model simulations, and demonstrate their combined effect is primarily through enhanced climate warming, rather than through induced changes in the carbon cycle. Overall, while limiting median projected global warming to below 1.5 °C is undoubtedly challenging, our results indicate it is not impossible as might be inferred from IPCC carbon budgets.

Nathan Gillett is an atmospheric scientist with research interests in the detection and attribution of climate change, and the influence of stratospheric ozone depletion on climate. He holds a PhD from the University of Oxford and is the manager of the Canadian Centre for Climate Modelling and Analysis (CCCma), where he oversees the development and application of Canada’s earth system model. He served as a lead author of the IPCC Fourth and Fifth Assessment Reports and of the 2014 WMO/UNEP Ozone Assessment.

Light refreshments will be served.

Implementing the Pan-Canadian Framework on Climate Change

March 28, 2017

In December 2016, the Prime Minister and Premiers announced a national plan to grow the economy, meet its emissions reduction targets under the Paris Agreement, and adapt to a changing climate: the Pan-Canadian Framework on Clean Growth and Climate Change. We know the Framework includes plans to price carbon, phase out coal-fired plants, grow the clean tech sector, and increase renewable energy supply (among others), but how will Canada turn these commitments into action? Member of Parliament Jonathan Wilkinson will discuss key components of the framework, progress, and what Canadians can expect on climate action.

Join us for a free public dialogue with Jonathan Wilkinson, Member of Parliament for North Vancouver and Parliamentary Secretary to the Minister of Environment and Climate Change, Catherine McKenna.

When: Tuesday, March 28, 2017 from 12:30 - 1:30 PM
Where: SFU Harbour Centre, 515 West Hastings Street, Room 7000

Webcast: https://www.youtube.com/user/carbontalks/live

This is a free, public event - please register to save your seat. 

Speaker:

Jonathan Wilkinson, Member of Parliament for North Vancouver

This talk is hosted by Carbon Talks with support from PICS.

Towards a Circular City

March 15, 2017

The concept of the “circular city” has the potential to solve a number of urban challenges

A circular economy aims to replace a traditional linear “take-make-waste” economy with one that is “restorative and regenerative by design”. While this approach has been primarily championed by businesses, cities are also in a position to capitalize on the benefits of a circular economy. But, what does a municipal approach to a circular economy look like? What are the opportunities and barriers, and which examples should cities follow?

Join us for a free public dialogue with a guest from the city of Amsterdam, which is a recognized leader in urban circularity and is taking steps to become a “circular city”.  Dr. Jacqueline Cramer is a circular economy ambassador of the Amsterdam Economic Board, strategic advisor at the Utrecht Sustainability Institute, and Professor of Sustainable Innovation at Utrecht University, and will be our guest for this Carbon Talk. 

When: Wednesday, March 15, 2017 from 12:30 - 1:30 PM
Where: SFU Harbour Centre, 515 West Hastings Street, Room 7000
Webcast: Can't make the dialogue? This event will be webcast live, courtesy of our partnership with the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions. Want a webcast reminder email? You may order a webcast reminder ticket from the event page. Join the conversation on Twitter at #CarbonTalks and Tweet your questions to @CarbonTalks

RESERVE YOUR SEAT

Dr. Jacqueline Cramer, Circular Economy Ambassador, Amsterdam Economic Board; Professor of Sustainable Innovation, Utrecht University; Strategic Advisor at the Utretcht Sustainability Institute 

Jacqueline Cramer is a strategic advisor of the Utrecht Sustainability Institute and in charge of the circular economy activities for the Amsterdam Economic Board. She is also the managing director of the consultancy firm ‘Sustainable Entrepreneurship; strategy and innovation consulting’, from which she worked as a senior advisor to more than 150 companies on the implementation of sustainable entrepreneurship and CSR. Before, she was the Cabinet Minister of Housing, Spatial Planning and the Environment of the Netherlands. Cramer has been a professor in the area of environmental management and sustainable innovation since 1990.

Next to this, she was and still is member of various (inter)national advisory boards of the government, industry and non-profit organisations.

Can cities have the foresight to adopt preventive measures before disaster strikes as we shift into a climate unsteady future?

As communities familiarize themselves with urban resilience, it becomes apparent that this concept is not just a trend; it is an opportunity. The increasing number of initiatives from agencies such as 100 Resilient Cities, Resilience Alliance, and the United Nations as well as the growing attention to the term in scholarly, professional and community forums support that urban resilience is relevant because of both its ability to systematically understand interactions, and because of its ability to explore and facilitate opportunities for proactive responses to short and long-term stresses in urban environments.

The Pacific Water Research Centre and Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions at SFU are pleased to invite you to this free public talk and discussion where invited guest speakers Nadine Magdefrau and Robin Chang from the Technical University of Dortmund in Germany will address this question drawing on examples from the Japanese earthquake and tsunami and the aftermath of long-term economic stresses in Rotterdam (NL) and Bremen (GE).  Moderator, Alec Balesescu will consider what implications these insights have on how to move towards an urban climate resilience future.

When: Thursday, March 9th 2017, from 7pm to 9 pm

Where: SFU Harbour Centre, 515 West Hastings Street, Room 1400

Recording  

Abstract/Bios

Can British Columbia's Forests Help to Reduce Emissions?

Forest and forest products can be a major piece of the low-carbon puzzle.

British Columbia's forests and forestry products have a large impact on provincial emissions, through both their ability to store and release carbon into the atmosphere. So what are the opportunities to manage forests and wood products with the goal reducing emissions? And how might climate change impacts interact with carbon-focused forest management goals? 

Join us for a free public dialogue with Dr. Werner Kurz, Senior Research Scientist at the Canadian Forest Service (Natural Resources Canada) and lead of the Pacific Institute of Climate Solutions' Forest Carbon Management Project. 

When: Thursday, February 16, 2017 from 12:30 - 1:30 PM
Where: SFU Harbour Centre, 515 West Hastings Street, Room 2270
Webcast: Can't make the dialogue? This event will be webcast live, courtesy of our partnership with the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions. Want a webcast reminder email? You may order a webcast reminder ticket from the event page. Join the conversation on Twitter at #CarbonTalks and Tweet your questions to @CarbonTalks

RESERVE YOUR SEAT

Speaker

Dr. Werner Kurz is a Senior Research Scientist at the Canadian Forest Service (Natural Resources Canada) in Victoria, BC. He leads the development of Canada's National Forest Carbon Monitoring, Accounting and Reporting System and the Forest Carbon Management Project of the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions. His research focuses on carbon dynamics in forests and harvested wood products and the opportunities of the forest sector to contribute to climate change mitigation. Dr. Kurz co-authored six reports of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC), published over 125 peer-reviewed scientific papers, and many other reports. He serves as adjunct professor at the University of British Columbia (UBC) and at Simon Fraser University. He obtained his PhD in Forest Ecology from UBC and an honorary doctorate from the Swedish Land University. He is an International Fellow of the Royal Swedish Academy of Agriculture and Forestry.

This event is hosted by Carbon Talks with support from the Pacific Institute for Climate Solutions

 

Is the Paris agreement on track?

What happened at COP22 and what does it mean for global cooperation on climate change?

At COP21 last December, the Paris Agreement was unanimously adopted and charted a new course in the global response to climate change. In Marrakesh this November, world governments came together for the first time since Paris to discuss the implementation of the Paris Agreement at COP22. Ministers and civil society met against the backdrop of fresh evidence that 2016 will be the warmest year on record and with the election of a new administration in Washington that could reverse American support for the Paris Agreement.

So what happened at COP22? What was (and wasn't) agreed to, and what does this mean for progress on climate change? We will hear from two experts who were deeply involved at this year's COP—Tzeporah Berman and Jennifer Allan.

When: Friday, December 9, 2016 from 12:30 - 1:30 PM

Where: SFU Harbour Centre, 515 West Hastings Street, Room 7000

This is a free public event.  

Register

Webcast: https://www.youtube.com/user/carbontalks/live

Panelists

Jennifer Allan, Team Leader/Writer, IISD Reporting Services, International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD)

Jen Allan is a PhD Candidate in political science at the University of British Columbia studying global environmental politics, particularly global efforts to address climate change and to reduce chemical pollution and waste. Her research focuses on the social aspects of environmental politics: why and how some social movements become involved in and even thrive in global environmental negotiations. She currently works with the International Institute for Sustainable Development (IISD). With IISD, she has attended many multilateral environmental negotiations, including all the negotiations for the new climate change agreement expected in Paris.

Tzeporah Berman, environmental activist and writer, Adjunct Professor at York University

Tzeporah Berman is a Canadian environmental activist and writer, and has 20 years of experience designing environmental campaigns in Canada and internationally. She is known for her role as the blockade coordinator for largest civil disobedience in Canada’s history in Clayoquot Sound in 1993.  She currently works as a strategic advisor to a number of First Nations, environmental organizations and philanthropic foundations on climate and energy issues, including the oil sands and pipelines. This year she was appointed by the Alberta Government to Co-Chair the Oilsands Advisory Working Group tasked with making recommendations to implement climate change and cumulative impact policies.  Last year she was appointed to the BC Government Climate Leadership Team tasked with making policy recommendations to meet BC legislated climate targets.  Tzeporah is an Adjunct Professor, Faculty of Environmental Studies, York University, the former Co-Director of Greenpeace International's Climate Program and Co-founder of ForestEthics.

Event supported by the Pacific Institute for Climate solutions

 

Powering Prosperity: Achieving local support for 100% renewable energy in Canada

November 24, 2016

As Canada's federal government prepares to meet its international climate change obligations and as several provinces ready to eliminate coal from their electricity mix, unique opportunities are emerging to transform Canada into a renewable energy leader. In this Carbon Talk, Dr. Jose Etcheverry, Co-Chair of the Sustainable Energy Initiative and Professor at York University, will look at safe strategies to help Canada achieve 100% renewable energy and prosperity at the community level. 

Link to the recording

Dr. Jose Etcheverry is the co-chair of the Sustainable Energy Initiative of York University, and a member of the World Council of Renewable Energy, Japan's Renewable Energy Innovation Network, and the Scientific Committee of the International Renewable Energy Storage Conference.

Event supported by the Pacific Institute for Climate solutions