History of the School

2017

  • SFU Engineering Science students take 1st prize in Western Engineering Competition for third consecutive year

2016

  • Bernhard Rabus named NSERC Industrial Research Chair in Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR).
  • SFU Engineering Science students take 1st prize in Western Engineering Competition for second consecutive year

2015

  • Lesley Shannon named NSERC Chair for Women in Science and Engineering.
  • Ash Parameswaran inducted as a fellow of the Canadian Academy of Engineering (CAE).
  • Innovation Boulevard medical imaging lab led by Ryan D'Arcy receives $3.6 million in federal investment

2014

  • British Columbia Alzheimer's Research Award Program awards Faisal Beg $1.5 million to help find solutions to Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.
  • Lesley Shannon is awarded the APEGBC Teaching Award for Excellence in Engineering and Geoscience Education.
  • The Canadian Foundation for Innovation (CFI) gives an award to Ryan D'Arcy to help establish his medical imaging lab at the hospital, where it will serve as a cornerstone to Surrey’s new health sciences initiative Innovation Boulevard.

2013

2011

  • Graduate student Andrew Au wins First Place in the 2011 BCNET Digital Media Challenge for his project that merges videos to create a 3D experience.
  • John Jones is awarded the APEGBC Teaching Award for Excellence in Engineering and Geoscience Education.
  • Ash Parameswaran is one of three Simon Fraser University professors to be recognized with an SFU Excellence in Teaching award.
  • The Mechatronic Systems Engineering program delivered at SFU Surrey receives accreditation from the Canadian Engineering Accreditation Board (CEAB).
  • John Jones becomes Director of the School of Engineering Science.

2010

  • John Jones is one of three Simon Fraser University professors to be recognized with an SFU Excellence in Teaching award.
  • Systems One is launched at SFU Surrey, a new cohort program for students entering their first year of studies in the Faculty of Applied Sciences.  Combining core courses in both Mechatronic Systems Engineering and Software Systems, this direct-entry program provides students with a streamlined pathway into Surrey-based programs in the Faculty of Applied Sciences.

2009

  • The Schools of Engineering and Computing Science form the re-structured Faculty of Applied Sciences, whose new focus is on high-technology and computational teaching and research.

2008

  • The Mechatronic Systems Engineering program and the Business School start a five-year co-op based "Double-Degree" Program.

2007

  • In April 2007, the Mechatronic Systems Engineering curriculum passed and received Senate Approval.
  • In September 2007, the new Mechatronic Systems Engineering Program accepts its first students – 65 undergraduates plus a group of graduate students located at SFU Surrey.
  • Mehrdad Saif is elected for a second five-year term as Director of the School.

2005

  • Engineering Science launches new Biomedical Engineering program. First students accepted into program start September 2005.

2004

  • Engineering Science student David Press wins the Governor-General’s Silver Medal for the top undergraduate student in SFU for attaining near perfect grades and the highest marks in the School of Engineering’s 21-year history.
  • Renovation planning begins in the Applied Sciences Building, including plans for a Wireless Communication Lab for research.
  • A proposal to offer the Mechatronic Systems Engineering (MSE) program at SFU Surrey is submitted and approved. Over the next three years, program planning takes place.

2003

  • Engineering Science professor John Bird develops sonar technology that provides high-resolution 3D underwater acoustic mappings and imaging allowing users to view the ocean floor in three dimensions.
  • Engineering Science graduate student Martin Dvorak is the recipient of a 2003 Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council doctoral prize for his creation of the world’s fastest bipolar transistor, a microscopic device that controls signals transmitted on optical fibers.
  • SFU Engineering Science students win five awards in the Canadian Engineering Competition 2003 – more than any other competing institutions.
  • SFU Engineering Science students win more than half of the communication awards at the annual ASI Exchange, organized by the Advanced Systems Institute of BC. SFU Engineering Science graduate students win eight out of 15 possible awards, while all undergraduate awards go to SFU Engineering Science undergraduate students.

2002

  • The B.C. Government Doubling the Opportunity (DTO) program begins, and SFU Engineering sets on a path of major expansion.
  • Mehrdad Saif takes on the Directorship of the School.

2001

  • Engineering Science professor Jim Cavers receives the R.A. McLachlan Memorial Award – APEGBC’s highest honor for a professional engineer.
  • SFU Engineering Science professor Colombo Bolognesi and Engineering Physics professor Simon Watkins jointly receive the 2001 New Frontiers in Research Award from the Science Council of BC for their work in the development of semiconductor devices based on new alloy crystals.
  • SFU Engineering Science professor Albert Leung wins the prestigious $100,000 Preston Manning Principal Award for Innovation for his invention of the micromachined thermal accelerometer.
  • SFU Engineering Science students are the grand prize winners of the $50,000 New Ventures BC Competition for their development of Air Games Wireless Inc.
  • SFU Engineering Science student Maria Trinh wins the 2001 Premier’s Award for young women in science.

1999

  • SFU Engineering Science professor Albert Leung develops and licenses his micromachined thermal accelerometer. The $1 billion market for inertial sensors finds use of his device ranging from smart shoes to NASA experiments in Mars.
  • SFU Engineering Science students design a mattress to help prevent Sudden Infant Death Syndrome.
  • SFU Engineering Science students design automated pill dispenser to aid forgetful seniors in remembering to take their pills.

1998

  • Engineering Science professor Jim Cavers wins the prestigious $100,000 Preston Manning Principal Award for Innovation for his invention of the adaptive digital predistorter, a device that increases the transmission capability of digital communications systems.

1997

  • Engineering Science student Lalit Nathawad earns the Governor-General Silver Medal as SFU’s top undergraduate student.
  • SFU Engineering Science hosts the first Micro Robot Soccer Tournament in Canada.
  • Engineering Science graduate student Pavel Heintz places fourth in the International Competition of Aerial Robotics in Orlando, Florida.
  • SFU Engineering Science graduate students William W. Li and Ali Faraz win “Best Student Exhibit” Award at the 1997 ASI Exchange.

1996

  • SFU Engineer Tim Collins wins the prestigious $100,000 Preston Manning Principal Award for his development of the V-chip as a simple mechanism for parents to control what their children watch on TV.
  • US President Bill Clinton signs the Telecommunications Act of 1996, requiring all future TV sets to include the V-Chip, invention of SFU Engineer Tim Collins.
  • Engineering Science professor Bill Gruver and Vladimir Cuperman elected Fellows of the IEEE.

1995

  • Engineering Science student Andreas Huster wins Governor-General’s Silver Medal as SFU’s top undergraduate student.
  • SFU Engineering Sciences’ Institute for Micromachining and Microfabrication research (IMMR) and the Japanese governments’ Mechanical Engineering Laboratory form micromachining partnership.
  • Tom Calvert wins the Xerox Canada-Forum Award.
  • Engineering Science professor Jim Cavers wins the prestigious BC Gold Medal in Engineering and Applied Sciences, presented by the Science Council of BC.

1994

  • SFU engineering students win “Best of Show” plus a gold prize in the domestic robot category for their improved MacroDog project at the annual BEAM Robot Olympics.

1993

  • First PhD degree awarded.
  • Faculty members: 22.
  • Undergraduate students: 245.
  • Graduate students: 92 (33 MEng, 41 MASc, 18 PhD).
  • SFU Engineering students win gold medal for technical excellence for their MacroDog project – plus silver for their innovative vision system –during the annual BEAM Robot Olympics.

1990

  • First MEng degree awarded.
  • First students admitted to the PhD program.

1989

  • First MASc degree awarded.
  • Move to the Applied Science Building.

1987

  • First students admitted to the Master of Applied Science Program.

1986

  • Engineering Science accredited by the Canadian Council of Professional Engineers.
  • First BASc degrees awarded.
  • First students admitted to the Master of Engineering Program (a part-time program designed for practicing engineers).

1985

  • First international internship: Mark Frass joins the Sony Corporation in Japan to complete his undergraduate thesis.
  • Renamed the School of Engineering Science under the Faculty of Applied Sciences.
  • Donald George appointed Dean of Applied Sciences and continues as Director of School of Engineering Science.
  • Move to the Academic Quadrangle with lab facilities in the old South Court Lounge.

1984

  • First industrial research contract awarded by Mobile Data International.
  • Evening graduate courses start on a special arrangements basis for practicing engineers.
  • First internships: 24 students placed at companies including Glenayre Electronics, IBM, MacDonald Dettwiler & Associates, Microtel Pacific Research, Robotic Systems International, Triumf and Vancouver General Hospital.

1983

  • Funding received from the government to officially establish Engineering Sciences.
  • 1st and 2nd year classes of 33 and 25 students, respectively, admitted.
  • Jim Cavers joins Donald George and Tom Calvert as the program's first professors.
  • Facilities: one small lecture room on the 7th floor of the Library.
  • Move to larger facilities in the Multi-Purpose Complex.

1981

  • Proposal for a traditional engineering program awarded to University of Victoria but SFU receives approval from the Universities Council of BC to develop Engineering Science, focusing on the high-tech side of engineering.
  • Donald George joins SFU as Visiting Professor of Computing Science. He heads the planning of a distinct engineering program to produce well-educated, innovative engineer-scientists with entrepreneurial skills and attitudes oriented to new technologies.
  • Donald George appointed as Director of Engineering.

1980

  • Senate approves a formal planning process.
  • Tom Calvert, as Director of Engineering, heads the planning committee to develop a traditional engineering program at SFU.
  • Carleton University’s Donald George is hired as one of the external consultants assisting with planning.

1979

  • Tom Calvert chairs an ad hoc committee examining the feasibility of establishing Engineering at SFU.