Linguistics Electives Without Pre-requisites | Fall 2020

Looking for an interesting elective to take? The following courses are open to all students and do not require any pre-requisites. Most of these courses also fulfill your Breadth-Social Sciences (B-Soc) or Breadth-Science (B-Sci) requirements. 

NOTE: If you are a Linguistics major student, you cannot count these courses as part of your B-Soc/Sci requirements. 

Please keep in mind that all Fall 2020 Lingusitics courses will continue to be offered online. For all courses below, the method of instruction, if available, has been listed. Synchronous refers to activities that are done live, during class times. Asynchronous refers to activities that are done offline on your own time.

LING 100 D100 -  COMMUNICATION AND LANGUAGE 

B-Soc

Monday, 1:30 - 2:20 pm
Wednesday, 1:30 - 2:20 pm
Friday, 1:30 - 2:20 pm

Asynchronous: Pre-recorded lectures
Synchronous: Live lectures (some weeks) Wednesdays 1:30 - 2:20 pm.
Maite Taboada

*This course has a reading week on the week of October 12th.

> view the full course outline 

This course introduces the study of language and human communication. Topics to be covered include:

  • the biological basis of human language
  • relations of language to cognition, culture and thought
  • structure in language 
  • the neurological basis of language and language disorders
  • language acquisition
  • languages of the world
  • language change
  • human language vs. animal communication 
  • evolution of human language 
  • language in society
  • writing systems

LING 100 D200 -  COMMUNICATION AND LANGUAGE 

B-Soc

Friday, 2:30 - 5:20 pm

Asynchronous: Pre-recorded lectures
Synchronous: Live lectures  Fridays 2:30 - 5:00 pm.
Trude Heift

*This course has a reading week on the week of October 12th.

> view the full course outline 

This course introduces the study of language and human communication. Topics to be covered include:

  • the biological basis of human language
  • relations of language to cognition, culture and thought
  • structure in language 
  • the neurological basis of language and language disorders
  • language acquisition
  • languages of the world
  • language change
  • human language vs. animal communication 
  • evolution of human language 
  • language in society
  • writing systems

LING 111 D100 - INTRO TO ENGLISH VOCABULARY ANALYSIS

B-Soc

Monday, 2:30 - 5:20 pm

Asynchronous: Pre-recorded lectures
Synchronous: Live lectures
Claudia Wong

*This course has a reading week on the week of October 12th.

> VIEW THE FULL COURSE OUTLINE 

This course introduces linguistics focusing on vocabulary through the medium of the English language. You’ll learn about where words come from and how and why there meanings and forms change.  The majority of the words in English are not native English words but borrowed from Latin, Greek and French - about 80% of the entire English vocabulary!

This course will be beneficial for all of you to enhance your formal and technical vocabulary. By the end of Ling111 you will be able to apply a variety of linguistic principles and analytical tools to determining how words are formed, their origin, how and why they change over time. Your vocabulary and especially terminology will grow tremendously. 

Practical issues like translation and interpretation feature in this course, too. Finally, toward the end of LING 111, we will examine how technology, social media, and even typography impact modern English vocabulary. And no course of this kind would be complete without a look at the influence of World Englishes — English as it is spoken in different parts of the world — and how these varieties influence the vocabulary of one another.

LING 160 D100 - LANGUAGE, CULTURE AND SOCIETY 

B-Soc

Tuesday, 2:30 - 5:20 pm

Asynchronous: Pre-recorded lectures
Synchronous: Live lectures Tuesdays 2:30 - 4:20 pm
Ivelina Tchizmarova

*This course has a reading week on the week of October 12th.

> VIEW THE FULL COURSE OUTLINE 

This course explores how language is a social phenomenon. For example, English as it is used in Vancouver is distinct from how it is used in New York City or Edinburgh, Scotland or Singapore. Within each of these contexts the users use English in ways that reflect their cultural identities, background, beliefs, practices, and values. 

This course explores these and other topics in sociolinguistics, the research field that examines the relationship between social factors, culture, and language use. Topics to be discussed include multilingualism in speech communities and the social reasons for language acquisition, language shift, language maintenance, language loss, and even language death.

The course looks at the phenomena of regional dialects (e.g. Newfoundland English; Texas English; Indian English) and social dialects (e.g. the Queen’s English vs. that of working class Londoners). It examines how language use can vary within a speech community depending on such social factors as ethnicity, gender, age, and class/caste. Additional topics include the role of politeness and stereotypes in language use, variation, and the relationship between language and cognition.

A special lecture will focus on the subject of World Englishes, which examines the international spread of English to speech communities around the globe. 

LING 200 D100 - INTRO TO ENGLISH SENTENCE ANALYSIS 

Wednesday, 2:30 - 5:20 pm

Asynchronous: Pre-recorded lectures (1.5 hours)
Synchronous: Live lectures (1.5 hours)
Claudia Wong

*This course has a reading week on the week of October 12th.

> VIEW THE FULL COURSE OUTLINE 

This course introduces you to commonly used terminology and concepts employed in analyzing English grammar. It’s a practical course. The materials will help you to develop the analytical skills needed for understanding how sentences are put together. LING 200 is not prescriptive, but rather takes a descriptive approach: it deals with how we actually use English. It’s a course that will appeal especially to those planning to teach English as a second language or who will be taking other linguistics or related courses at the university level.

LING 220 D100 - INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTICS 

B-Soc

One scheduled tutorial

Asynchronous: Pre-recorded lectures
Synchronous: Tutorials
Margaret Grant

*This course has a reading week on the week of October 12th.

> VIEW THE FULL COURSE OUTLINE 

This course introduces the complexities of human language by focusing on the core areas of linguistics: phonetics (production, transmission, and perception of speech), phonology (the patterning of speech sounds in language), morphology (word structure and formation), syntax (sentence structure and formation), and semantics (analysis of meaning in language).

LING 280 D100 - INTERDISCIPLINARY TOPICS IN LINGUISTICS 

INDIGENOUS LANGUAGES IN CANADA

Tuesday, 2:30 - 5:20 pm

Asynchronous: Pre-recorded lectures
Synchronous: Meetings and group activities Tuesdays 3:00 - 5:00 pm

Heather Bliss

*This course has a reading week on the week of October 12th.

> VIEW THE FULL COURSE OUTLINE 

> VIEW THE COURSE POSTER 

There are over 80 Indigenous languages in Canada, all of which are threatened by past, current, and ongoing colonialism. In this course, students will gain an awareness of the diversity of Indigenous languages in this country and will investigate examples of community-based language activism across Canada.

Together, we will explore topics such as: 

  • Language and culture
  • Language and land
  • Language and wellness
  • Language policy
  • Language education

LING 290 D100 - THE SCIENCE OF SPEECH 

B-Soc

Monday, 3:30 - 4:50 pm
Wednesday, 3:30 - 4:50 pm

Asynchronous: Pre-recorded lectures
Synchronous: Lectures, quizzes, and exams

Murray Munro

> VIEW THE FULL COURSE OUTLINE 

This course introduces speech in many forms: from the international phonetic alphabet, to waveforms on a computer, to move your tongue, lips, and jaw, to producing foreign speech sounds. You will also study how this science of speech can be applied, whether in tech fields, in health clinics, in the courtroom, or in art.