News

News in the world of languages and literature

Learn about our outstanding instructors and our inspiring students! Find out when we win awards and introduce new courses. 

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WLL news stories

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  • March 29, 2021

    March 29, 2021

    Inspired by her memories of dancing as a child, Rhiannon Wallace brings a joyful tale of artistic passion and self-acceptance to life in her first children’s book, Leopold’s Leotard.

  • March 29, 2021

    March 29, 2021

    A Gothic-without-borders online conference Hosted by the Department of World Languages and Literatures in tandem with the SFU Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences at Simon Fraser University.

  • February 19, 2021

    February 19, 2021

    When the COVID pandemic forced SFU to go online, Professor Elena Caselli, a term lecturer of Italian in the Department of World Languages and Literatures, was not was not ready for the change. But by the beginning of the fall session she had adapted and was ready to deliver a course specifically designed for the remote environment.

  • September 14, 2020

    September 14, 2020

    UBC and SFU students of Italian Studies are invited to participate in a contest related to the theme of this year’s Week of the Italian Language in the World: “Italian Between Word and Image: Graffiti, Illustrations and Comic Books.” Express what Italian language and culture mean to you in a creative way for a chance to win a free online course in Italian language!

  • August 12, 2020

    August 12, 2020

    Professor Melek Ortabasi is serious when she says that studying a foreign language and literatures from around the world can give you superpowers. In this interview, she explains how the department of World Languages and Literatures nurtures critical thinking, imagination, and cross-cultural understanding.

  • June 16, 2020

    June 16, 2020

    Some see the glass as half empty. Some see the glass as half full. Melek Ortabasi and Joel Heng Hartse see the glass as overflowing with potential.

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