THIS DAY IN SFU HISTORY...

SFU50, SFU ATOM, ARCHIVES, DIGITAL ACCESS

Discover SFU's Digital Archives by Following This Day in SFU History

May 08, 2018
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By Michelle Curran

As part of SFU's 50th Anniversary celebration, the Archives and Records Management Department is excited to announce the launch of its news blog, This Day in SFU History. Beginning next month, This Day in SFU History will feature newly digitized records and how to access them in SFU AtoM

Materials include archival footage, letters by Simon Fraser himself, an unpublished manuscript about SFU’s distinctive architecture, interviews with SFU’s founding chancellor Gordon Shrum, plus photographs, films, and much more!

Stay tuned, and be sure to subscribe to This Day in SFU History by clicking the feed icon  in the right column of this page.

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  • February 25, 2016

    Behind every photograph, there’s a story. Among the most frequently requested items in the Archives are George Allen’s aerial photos of SFU’s excavation and construction site.

  • September 07, 2015

    Digitized versions of the original program books from SFU’s Opening and Installation Ceremonies, are now accessible online. To learn more about these and other events during the early years of SFU's history, visit SFU AtoM and look for the answers in the Archives.

  • June 05, 2015

    Film aficionados will be interested to know that SFU Archives houses approximately 1200 reels of 8, 16, and 35 mm films. This is Simon Fraser University is one film in that treasure trove. The original film was produced by the SFU Resources Office in 1971 on acetate-based, 16 mm color film with a magnetic sound track.

  • July 03, 2015

    With the launch of SFU AtoM, the Archives is now making available "The Design for Simon Fraser University and the Problems Accompanying Excellence," an unpublished manuscript by Gene Waddell. Access a digitized copy today, and trace SFU's architectural history!

  • May 08, 2015

    During each month of SFU’s 50th anniversary year, we will feature and discuss in our blog the significance of newly digitized records. 'This Day in SFU History' will explain how you can access the records from SFU AtoM, the Web portal to our digital repository.