IRC Committee Members

Current and recent IRC Committee Members (2021-2022, 2022-2023)

Rachel Fouladi
Associate Professor
IRC Co-Chair (2021-2022; 2022-2023)

ha7lh skwáyel,   ta néwyap

hello, bonjour, سلام, hallo, ᑕᓂᓯ. My name is Rachel Fouladi. As a faculty member teaching and working at SFU whose campuses are on ancestral, traditional and unceded lands, I respectfully acknowledge that I do so as an uninvited guest in these territories. I hope that through personal and collective action, particularly in the context of what we do in the SFU Psychology Department, we can move the dial on Reconciliation. I am grateful, privileged and honoured to be a member of the SFU Psychology Department Indigenous Reconciliation Committee (IRC) and to try to be part of facilitating meaningful changes and opportunities for students, faculty and staff as part of (Re)concili-aCtion.

Read her longer profile here.

Michael Schmitt
Professor
IRC Co-Chair (2022-2023)

Personal statement forthcoming

Jodi Viljoen
Professor
IRC Co-Chair (2021-2022)
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IN MEMORIAM

The SFU Department of Psychology's tribute to Dr. Jodi Viljoen can be found here.

Dr. Jodi Viljoen's was instrumental in the formation of the Indigenous Reconciliation Committee in 2018 and its ongoing operations through Spring 2022, when she passed away. Thoughtful and caring, Jodi was extremely concerned with enacting work towards reconcilation. She was instrumental in many aspects of the work of the IRC, with particular interests in access to cultural safety training for graduate students, staff and faculty in the Department of Psychology. Humble, she acknowledged and characterized herself as a learner. Gentle thoughtfulness, caring, consideration, and kindesss infused her interactions and work. Serving on the IRC and the work of the IRC were extremely important to her. Earlier in 2022, the IRC website was updated to include personal introductions and statements so people could know us better. If you have not done so previously, you are invited to read Jodi's self-introduction words and reflections on the importance of the IRC to her.

We honour and remember Dr. Jodi' Viljoen for her ways of being, her role in our lives and work of the IRC.

If anyone would like to make a memorial donation in her honour, her family had suggested donations to Indspire and to the Canadian Mental Health Association. 

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Dr. Jodi Viljoen's words from earlier in Spring 2022:

I am a white settler who lives and works on the unceded territories of the səl̓ilw̓ətaʔɬ (Tsleil-Waututh), kʷikʷəƛ̓əm (Kwikwetlem), Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Úxwumixw (Squamish) and xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Musqueam) Nations. Over the years, I have chance to work with a number of Indigenous students. I have learned so much from them and am extremely grateful. Having a chance to work with Indigenous students helped me become more aware of systematic racism and barriers faced by Indigenous students, and the ways in which I needed to do better. I love being a member of the Indigenous Reconciliation Committee and being a part of a group of Indigenous peoples and settlers working together towards reconciliation.

Read her full profile here.

McKenzie Braley
Clinical Neuropsychology PhD student

My name is McKenzie Braley. I am Nehiyaw/Cree from my father’s side and have European settler ancestry from my mother’s side. I am a member of Saddle Lake Cree Nation in Alberta. Currently, I am a PhD student in the Clinical Neuropsychology program at SFU. Supervised by Dr. Jodi Viljoen in the Adolescent Risk and Resilience lab, my doctoral dissertation focuses on culturally safe ways for mental health clinicians to do clinical interviews with Indigenous Peoples in the justice system. Broadly, my interests include neuropsychology, forensic psychology, Indigenous cultural safety, and the intersections of these areas. In my career, I aim to do clinical and research work with individuals who have neurological, medical, and psychiatric conditions, and also with those involved in the justice system.

Read her full profile here.

Rachel Coopsie  -- former member: 2021-2022
Undergraduate PSYC Student

My name is Rachel Coopsie, my pronouns are she/her, and I am a Huu-Ay-Aht citizen from where we now call Vancouver Island. I am also settler-Canadian with German/Irish ancestry on my father's side. Currently, I study full time at Simon Fraser University in the Department of Psychology where I am learning more about close relationships as well as abnormal psychology and clinical treatment. I would like to take the knowledge and skills attained here and put them towards providing accessible and comfortable counselling options to primarily Indigenous and marginalized persons who may not feel as comfortable with a settler-Canadian counsellor and would prefer to work with an Indigenous counsellor. 

Read her full profile here.

Sherene Balanji
Graduate MA Student in Clinical Child Psychology Program

As an uninvited settler on the unceded lands of the Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Úxwumixw, Tsleil-Waututh, Kwikwetlem and xʷməθkʷəy̓əm First Nations, I am passionate about doing my part to work towards reconciliation. As a current graduate student in the Clinical Child Psychology program, I am honoured to have the opportunity to be a part of this committee and I hope to incorporate decolonization into as many areas of my life as possible, but particularly in my academic journey. I view reconciliation as a life-long learning process that I am thrilled to continue with the IRC. By joining this committee, I hope that I will be able to use a place of privilege as a White-passing settler to encourage my mentors and classmates to integrate reconciliation and decolonization into their work as psychologists and clinicians.

Todd Nelson
Undergraduate BNS Student

My name is Todd Nelson. I am Nlaka’pamux from Spuzzum First Nation in “British Columbia” on my father’s side and South Korean on my mother’s side. I lived in Saudi Arabia for most of my childhood and only moved back in grade 11. Although I grew up immersed in Korean and Arabic culture, I was not exposed to my First Nation’s culture and traditions at all. Regretfully, I didn’t have the connections to my community until quite recently. I am now beginning to get more involved with my community and learning as much as I can. I am also an undergraduate student in Behavioural Neuroscience where I am conducting an honours thesis looking into methods to combat tremours in golfers. My time is also spent as a member of the Indigenous Reconciliation Committee. While I am still in the life-long process of learning, I hope to meaningfully contribute to reconciliation within the Psychology Department.

Read his full profile here.


Tara Smith

Manager, Academic and Administrative Services

My name is Tara Smith, my pronouns are she/her, and I was fortunate to grow up on the lands of the Acadia First Nation (part of the Mi'kmaw Nation) in beautiful Nova Scotia. I first started learning about Indigenous history and became interested in reconciliation efforts in 2018 when I completed the San’Yas Anti-Racism Indigenous Cultural Safety Program. In 2021, I have been blessed with the opportunity to expand my learnings with Indigenous courses in the Graduate Diploma in Business Administration and Master of Business Administration programs and these learnings have made me passionate about contributing in any way possible towards reconciliation efforts. While I actively acknowledge that I still have much learning to do, I am grateful to be part of the Psychology Indigenous Reconciliation Committee as the staff representative and I look forward to continuing my learning of Indigenous cultures and reconciliation.

Natalie Goulter (thru March 2022)
Adjunct Professor

Natalie Goulter, Ph.D., is a University Research Associate and Adjunct Professor within the Department of Psychology at Simon Fraser University, Canada. She received her M.Sc. in Psychology at the University of Otago, New Zealand, under the supervision of Professor Michael Colombo, and her Ph.D. in Psychology at the University of New South Wales, Australia, under the supervision of Professor Eva Kimonis. After her Ph.D., she completed a Postdoctoral Fellowship collaborating with Professor Robert McMahon (Director: Institute for the Reduction of Youth Violence) and Professor Marlene Moretti (Director: Adolescent Health Lab) at Simon Fraser University.