"I am extremely grateful for to be a part of SFU's Coastal Hazards Research Lab. My research has given me opportunities to collaborate with renowned researchers in this field and to engage in adventurous field work with my research group. These exciting experiences continue to inspire me to pursue researching natural hazards at SFU."

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Student Profile: Anthony Giang

October 14, 2021
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Earth Sciences master's student in the Faculty of Science

I am a first-generation Chinese Canadian who was born and raised in the Lower Mainland. I recently graduated from SFU with a bachelor's degree from the Chemistry and Earth Sciences Joint Honours program. My honours thesis project involved reconstructing the paleotsunami history at Ahuriri Lagoon, New Zealand over the past 1,000 years. I decided to continue with graduate school in the Earth Sciences Master's program and am investigating earthquake and tsunamis in Port Alberni, British Columbia.

WHY DID YOU CHOOSE TO COME TO SFU?

I decided to stay at SFU for my Master's Degree because of my supervisor Jessica Pilarczyk. My time in the Coastal Hazards Research Lab with her as an undergraduate student was so exciting and memorable that I wanted to continue pursuing research in this field. I was also given the opportunity to be a part of a large project to study earthquake and tsunami hazards in British Columbia. I am particularly invested in this research topic because of my interest in natural hazards, as well as pursing research to benefit and safeguard the community I was raised in.

HOW WOULD YOU DESCRIBE YOUR RESEARCH OR YOUR PROGRAM TO A FAMILY MEMBER?

My research involves using the geologic record to reconstruct earthquake and tsunami events in the past. In particular, I am using proxies such as grain size, microfossils, and elemental geochemistry to investigate salt marsh sediment from Port Alberni. This project aims to identify earthquake and tsunami events within the past ~5,000 years as well as to quantify their magnitudes and intensities. The Pacific coast of North America does not have any modern records of large earthquake events since the most recent earthquake rupture occurred over 300 years ago. Therefore, we must rely on the geologic record to extend our understanding of seismic hazards. My research will ultimately help inform British Columbians of the seismic hazards they face as well as to improve community preparedness.

WHAT ARE YOU PARTICULARLY ENJOYING ABOUT YOUR STUDIES/RESEARCH AT SFU?

I am extremely grateful for to be a part of SFU's Coastal Hazards Research Lab. My research has given me opportunities to collaborate with renowned researchers in this field and to engage in adventurous field work with my research group. These exciting experiences continue to inspire me to pursue researching natural hazards at SFU.

HAVE YOU BEEN THE RECIPIENT OF ANY MAJOR OR DONOR-FUNDED AWARDS? IF SO, PLEASE TELL US WHICH ONES AND A LITTLE ABOUT HOW THE AWARDS HAVE IMPACTED YOUR STUDIES AND/OR RESEARCH.

I am grateful to have been awarded the CGS-M NSERC scholarship in 2021. This award has allowed my semesters to be more flexible with allocating time towards my research project. Receiving this award has provided me with a boost of confidence and inspiration to pursue my passion for geology.

 

Contact : agiang@sfu.ca