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As well as providing an enriched interdisciplinary context for study, the MA in Comparative Media Arts prepares students for work as curators, cultural programmers, arts administrators, arts writers, and other careers in the arts. It also prepares students for a range of PhDs that study the fine and performing arts.

Christophe Devos

MA Graduate Student

Christophe Devos is a born-and-raised Vancouverite, francophone, and self-proclaimed cinephile whose passion for cinema began in early childhood while visiting his neighborhood Blockbuster to rent movies. Having earned a BFA in Art History (Concordia University, 2018) and a BA in Film Studies (UBC, 2021), Christophe acquired an affinity for the critical frameworks of intersectionality, queer theory, media and cultural studies. For his MA research, Christophe aims to demonstrate how the music video offers a significant channel for visualizing the latent queerness of children and disrupting the assumed division between child and adult.

 

Roman Dubrule

MA Graduate Student

Roman Dubrule is a Francophone MA student originally from Grande Prairie, Alberta. With experiences ranging from performing as a professional jazz pianist all over Western Canada, to launching an impromptu career as the head of programming for two French-Canadian radio stations, and to having a passion-fuelled hiatus in the Okanagan wine industry, Roman considers approaching everything from the perspective of a musician. Holding a BMus in Jazz and Contemporary Music with a Major in Performance from MacEwan University, Roman is excited to explore his alternative passion for philosophy in a deeper way during his Master’s studies, to continue elaborating the importance of art in the meaningful development of societies and self. Roman’s academic interests lie especially in process philosophy (through the lenses of Whitehead and Deleuze) as relating to aesthetics, cosmologically and in everyday life. His current philosophical thought lies greatly on memory and its connection to art, using Deleuze, James, as well as Wittgenstein to reconcile the often paradoxical and shifting nature of things and concepts in the world. 

Jason Kennedy

MA Graduate Student

Jason is conducting research on the affect of harmonic overtones and frequencies using hand crafted specialized instruments of wood, brass, metal, stone, water, crystal, and organics called the "Sonorium". Designed and created by an ethnomusicologist, sound scientist, and collaborator with indigenous tribes in South America and India, Aurelio C. Hamer is the founder of Svaram – an innovative sound and research center located a few hours south of Chennai in the unique town of Auroville, India.  

Jason is an apprentice to the Yogi and sound practitioner Nora Lim – founder of Think off the Mat – who was trained by Hamer in Auroville, India. Nora and Jason design sound journeys and sound experiences with the Sonorium for individuals and small groups. His research as an apprentice is to inquire into the phenomenological experience and the performative affect that these instruments may or may not have on living tissue and emotional, social, and perceptual states of being.

Jason (M.A. Music Education + B.A. Jazz Performance) has extensive experience teaching general music, Orff, band, orchestra, music technology, and organizing music festivals for children (pre-K - 12) and adults. While living in New York City, Jason helped design the curriculum and pedagogy for the Jazz@Lincoln Center - WeBop! program under the direction of Wynton Marsalis and Dr. Lori Custodero of Teachers College, Columbia University. After a decade in NYC, Jason taught music in Kuala Lumpur – Malaysia, Hong Kong, and Chennai – India.

Having lived and traveled extensively throughout Asia for the past 14 years has afforded Jason multiple perspectives in art, music, and culture and how it relates to education. Jason is a certified music, yoga and mindfulness teacher, and integrates these perspectives into the pedagogy of creative and performance art. Jason's community service includes volunteering at 'Hekima Place' in Nairobi, Kenya, 'Caring for Cambodia' in Siem Reip, Cambodia, and the 'Tree Foundation' in Chennai, India.

Clara Lam

MA Graduate Student

Clara Lam completed her BFA in Fashion Marketing and Management at Savannah College of Art and Design in the United States. Having worked in organizing art exhibitions and museum collections in Hong Kong with the initiative to engage local communities, she became aware of the powerful influence contemporary arts has on transforming societies. For the MA program, Clara is interested in researching the intertwining relationship and connection between Hegemonic Culture, Conflict and Contemporary Arts. Through exploring the dynamic and chemistry of the trio, she hopes to substantiate the idea that contemporary arts is an indispensable gearing force of cultural transformation.  

William Latham

MA Graduate Student

William Latham completed his BA at the University of Alberta as a double major in Philosophy and Film Studies. Throughout his education he has long been interested in this intersection, between the glacial patience of philosophical inquiry and the endlessly fickle and flickering rapidity of contemporary media consumption. Having a particular fondness for the work of Gilles Deleuze, as well as continental philosophy generally, William is especially intrigued by the emergent philosophical questions regarding the new media landscape we now find ourselves inhabiting. In particular, he is interested in the metaphysical significance of surveillant technologies, especially as seen through the extant tensions found amongst Deleuzian affect theory, ethics, and freedom. 

Juliet Li

MA Graduate Student

Juliet Li hails from the south part of China, and is a theater fanatic and a movie lover. She was bonded with performance since her first ballet lesson at 4. She began her academic inquiry into theater during her undergraduate degree at Queen’s University, Kingston. Most recently, her research interests include film and performance aesthetics, performance theory, film theory, Chinese opera, and literature on performance and film. She is always drawn to the liveness and humanness in performance and films. To her, liveness is being present and humanness means humanity.

Dale MacDonald

MA Graduate Student

Dale MacDonald is a performance director, writer, and educator working in Vancouver. After spending most of his childhood in a theatre, he went on to complete his BA/BEd from the University of Alberta. Since then Dale has been directing and writing short plays in Vancouver; his play, maleficarum, was performed at Pull Festival VI and subsequently published in the festival’s anthology in 2017. Additionally, inspired by the countless hours and late nights of his own adolescence spent in theatres, Dale founded his own youth theatre company in 2018. Dale’s research takes its shape as the unearthing of live-horror aesthetics in response to the lack of both artistic and funding validation granted to the genre. It is an exploration of how ritual, abject, and the uncanny valley weave together in liminal space to churn the stomachs and souls of an audience.

Abede Mohammadi

MA Graduate Student

Abede Mohammadi holds an MA from the Tehran University of Art in Philosophy of Art and a BA in Social Communication and Media from the University of Tehran. Her working experience in a publishing house and writing a thesis about contemporary art encourage her to pursue a more critical and comprehensive education in Contemporary Art. At SFU, she hopes to combine her passion for art with a practical approach, such as art-writing and curating. Abede is most interested in exploring different visual and cultural narratives in the modern Middle East as well as raising critical discussions around contemporary Iranian art through interdisciplinary academic research.

Carina Xu

MA Graduate Student

Carina Xu is a graduating MA candidate that looks at experimental documentary installations for sensorial ways of mapping racial capitalism and contextualizing geopolitical conflicts. The examined works centres on the displaced, censored, diasporic, and exilic by tracing geographies of loss. Adopting the lens of Edward Said’s imaginative geographies and Jacques Derrida’s spectralities, her research explores how "absent" characters resurface as affective indices that haunt the past, present, and future of the land they inhabit. These case studies seek to crystallize a spectral documentation method for installations to encounter otherwise inaccessible knowledge of the mundane and banality in land dispossession and settler-colonial renderings of property ownership.

In addition to her research journey, Carina co-curated the audio-visual installation "Pauline Johnson's Legends" as part of SFU Bennett Library's Special Collections and Rare Books Exhibit in 2020. The work features the Johnson's Legends of Vancouver, employs editing software defects and reversed sound-mixing as it reflects on the curators' changing relationship with land and technology, projecting the reimagined memory of X̱wáýx̱way as reprocessed. Carina has also worked for DOXA Documentary Film Festival and The Cinematheque in communications and education roles while living and learning on the unceded ancestral territories of the Coast Salish peoples of səl̓ilw̓ətaʔɬ  (Musqueam), Sḵwx̱wú7mesh Úxwumixw (Squamish) and xʷməθkʷəy̓əm (Tsleil-Waututh) Nations.

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